Tagged With myths

28

Finding clear, definitive facts about healthy exercise can be difficult. The exercise industry is a multi-billion dollar business, built partially on selling gadgets and supplements to people desperate to lose weight or look attractive. Meanwhile, good workout plans and simple truths lurk in the background waiting for their time to shine. All of this results in lots of misinformation about exercise. We're taking some of those commonly-held exercise myths to task, and we have science to back us up. Let's get started.

1

American cheese has a bad reputation, especially among foodies and health-conscious folks. (Think the bright yellow stuff at McDonald's.) You might hear claims that it's made of "plastic" or "chemicals," but it turns out the truth is nothing scary. American-style cheese is just cheese mixed with melting salts and ordinary ingredients like milk.

0

Feeling sick and unhealthy? It's because you eat too many acidic foods that make your body equally acidic and harm your health. Eat more alkaline (opposite of acidic) foods to heal your body! But if our blood pH fluctuated that easily, we'd all be in serious trouble.

0

You crave it in the morning, you wait in long lines for it and I'm drinking it while I write this: Coffee is everywhere. But that means misinformation about it is everywhere too. Coffee doesn't rob you of water, sober you up or keep your children short, so let's grind up these myths and brew a hot pot of truth.

0

It's a stereotype, but many of us have made the assumption that scientists are a bit rigid and less artistic than others. Artists, on the other hand, are often seen as being less rational than the rest of us. Sometimes described as the left side of the brain versus the right side — or simply logical thinking versus artistic creativity — the two are often seen as polar opposites.

0

You may not want to swallow your chewing gum, but if you did, it wouldn't kill you. It wouldn't stay in your stomach for seven years, either. The dangers of swallowing your gum have been greatly exaggerated.

88

Is milk really good for your bones? Are all salty snacks unhealthy? Do you need to drink two litres of water per day? These are just some scientific food "facts" that aren't as concrete as you might think. We talked to a group of nutritionists and asked them to share the food myths they find most irritating and explain why people cling to them. Here's what they said.