Tagged With google

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Everywhere you turn, someone is handing out advice about account security and privacy. And while it never hurts to be reminded about all the ways you can protect your critical data, have you stopped to wonder whether any of the various security measures you’re taking are actually effective?

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Emojis add a little personality to your messages and social media posts, and there are so many of them to pick from that they’re practically their own language at this point. Even then, sometimes you’ll find that there isn’t one that quite fits what you’re trying to say.

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When Google Chrome starts blocking your downloads in a few months, know that it’s nothing personal; the browser is just doing its best to keep you safe. You should also know that Chrome isn’t flawless, and you should still be running regular antivirus and antimalware scans—and avoiding shitty websites and their malware.

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Our smartphones can display tons of information and provide helpful shortcuts even when they’re locked, and Google Assistant’s Ambient Mode is worth trying out. It allows you to use several of your phone’s best features without having to unlock it, saving you precious time and the annoyance of fumbling around with your finger to authenticate into your device.

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Internet ads are so invasive that we can’t blame you for thinking that Facebook is listening to you talk. It’s probably not, but it is helping ad networks track you across the internet and across your apps. In 2018, tech public policy expert Chris Yiu tweeted 14 different ways that ads follow you around the internet, even when you’re logged out, in incognito, using a different browser, or on a new device.

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There are many ways to update an Android phone. Most people probably wait for the latest patches to arrive and let their phones run the update automatically. This is the most convenient option, but it’s also the slowest, since it depends on your carrier to roll the update out to you. There are ways to get updates faster—like sideloading new updates yourself—but these can be intimidating and confusing for people who don’t want to mess around with extra software or system-level operations.

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Apple’s has redesigned the mobile version of iCloud, and if you live in a divided house—Android and iOS/iPadOS devices living in perfect harmony—you should check out the new website, especially if you’re on an Android smartphone or tablet. In fact, you might even go so far as to install it on your device as a progressive web app (PWA), for easier access.

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Chrome 80 dropped yesterday, and the usual advice applies. If your desktop browser hasn’t already updated itself, or you aren’t sure, go visit its “About Google Chrome” page either by clicking on the triple-dot icon in the upper-right corner of your Windows browser or the “Chrome” menu of your Mac browser.

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As an iPhone user with a Gmail address, I’m envious of all the Android owners who get to use dark mode in their Gmail apps. While Google claims such magic is available on iOS, I’ve never seen the option—and I’m not alone. So I’m enjoying a little schadenfreude at recent reports that dark mode has up and disappeared in some instances of the Gmail app on Android.

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RCS messaging is here—thanks, Google—but there’s still a chance that you can’t flip the switch on it because, again, Google. Yes, it’s another feature rollout, which means you’ll be staring at your phone for some unknown amount of time, hoping it reveals to you the setting you can use to turn on something that sounds really awesome on paper.