Tagged With firefox

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Browser extensions are fantastic but, as superheroes have taught us, with great power comes great responsibility. Malicious developers can hide bad behaviour inside useful extensions and when they slip through the screening process, the only option left to the likes of Mozilla and Google is to ban them. Mozilla has updated its blocked add-on list and it includes an extension the company itself gave the thumbs-up just this week.

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If you've stumbled across an image on the internet — perhaps on your favourite social media site — and you want to know more about it, you can always ask the person responsible for the post. Odds are good that they probably just cribbed the image from somewhere else and don't know any more about where it came from. But that's fine. You can also take on the detective work yourself and there are plenty of resources to help you out.

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Do you ever feel that the web is breaking? When shopping online for a toaster, you can expect an ad for that thing to stalk you from site to site. If you have just a few web browser tabs open, your laptop battery drains rapidly. And don't get me started on those videos that automatically play when you're scrolling through a webpage.

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Say a webpage isn’t loading right. Maybe it’s collapsed from too much traffic after going viral on Reddit. Maybe it’s blocked in your country thanks to a law like GDPR. Maybe it was recently deleted. Usually Google has a saved copy of that page. And the quickest way to get that saved copy is to type cache: in the address bar.

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One of the more annoying aspects of watching Netflix on your laptop or desktop computer is the trailers the service likes to automatically play on your behalf. Thankfully, there's a neat extension for Chrome and Firefox that fixes this issue - and a bunch more besides.

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Firefox says they are testing a new feature that will allow you to easily check if your email address has been involved in a data breach and provide recommendations on what to do to protect your personal data. The new feature, which has a strong Australian connection, will initially be deployed to 250,000 users, most of whom will be from the United States, before becoming widely available.

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How many times have you gone to share an interesting story (or comic) with a friend — a pretty standard process — only to find that the short URL you thought you were copying and pasting is actually one giant, messy paragraph of text. You can thank all the services and sites that append a ton of extra junk to URLs so they can have a better understanding of how you visited the site, what you've looked at and where you're going.

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Browser cookies are useful in some instances; unpleasant in others. While they can save you from having to go through a complicated authentication process whenever you're trying to access your favourite sites, they can also store data on what you've done on a particular website -- which can then be used to serve you more "relevant" advertising at a future point.