Tagged With diets

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A thrusting young buck at work recently approached me to ask for some tips on toning up. He does a lot of exercise but lives pretty generously. That means, whatever his body asks him for, he generously provides. As a result he has cultivated something of a "Dadbod" and has now decided to take action to stem the tide.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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Walnuts already have an image as a healthyish food, but the California Walnut Commission wanted to know more. A new study asked if walnuts -- already associated with lower risks of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes -- might deliver some of their health benefits by changing our brains' reactions to food.

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What should you cut out of your diet to be more healthy? Everything. According to the most popular diet books on the market, there's barely a food on Earth that's safe to eat. But what is the actual benefit of these diets? Here's what science has to say.

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The guiding principle of 'paleo' is to only eat foods that were consumed by our Paleolithic ancestors. There's only one problem: almost everything we think we know about prehistoric humans' diets is based on conjecture. (There were no caveman cookbooks or reality TV shows, sadly.) In other words, paleo "experts" like Pete Evans are guessing about the past.

As it turns out, a lot of this guesswork has been flat-out wrong. A new analysis of Neanderthal teeth uncovered in Spain and Belgium has discovered a lot more variation in Paleolithic diets than we previously thought. Here's the evidence.

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Feeling sick and unhealthy? It's because you eat too many acidic foods that make your body equally acidic and harm your health. Eat more alkaline (opposite of acidic) foods to heal your body! But if our blood pH fluctuated that easily, we'd all be in serious trouble.

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I didn't live through the Great Depression even though I sometimes eat as if I did. Despite a desire to keep thin I have a bad habit of clearing every last greasy morsel of rice or supposedly decorative garnish that's put in front of me. Kicking this habit has helped me feel better about myself.

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People are obsessed with detoxing after the holiday season, as the guilt of consuming enough food for a family of four over a two week period creeps up on them in the New Year. Juice cleanses are popular during this time. Sadly, they simply don't work.

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Calorie counting is widely considered to be one of the most effective weight-loss methods. But what does 100 calories actually look like on a plate? Without having a food scale handy it can be pretty difficult to tell! This in-depth infographic shows the amount of grub you get in a 100-calorie serving across all major food groups, from grains to vegetables.

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"Low kilojoule" foods are all the rage these days. Sure, they may seem like a good idea on the surface, but sometimes they're as silly as thinking "if I cut this cake in half, I can eat twice the amount." Here's how to tell when the lower-kilojoule option is the right decision.

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Dear Lifehacker, I've decided I want to get healthier and shed some excess weight. I'm pretty time-poor, so I'll be mainly relying on diet microwave dinners from the supermarket (Weight Watchers, Lean Cuisine, McCain Healthy Choice, etc.) My question is: will these products actually help me lose weight? And are they considered healthy?

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The so-called palaeodiet, and now even the palaeo-epigenetic diet, has come under a lot of scrutiny of late for making wild and unsubstantiated claims and for being downright dangerous to our health. I think it's fair to ask if we're serious about the palaeolifestyle, then just how far are we prepared to take this obsession with our Stone Age heritage and its claimed benefits?