Tagged With census 2016

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According to data released today, there were 23,401,892 people who were counted in Australia on the night of the 2016 Census who were usually resident in Australia. After adjusting for undercount and adding back those who were overseas on census night, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) estimates that as of December 2016, Australia’s population was around 24.4 million.

Our population is growing – and fast. But can we trust the numbers?

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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After a painful data collection process, the Australian Bureau of Statistics has finally begun to release its findings from the 2016 Census. The organisation has released a "preview" of the key characteristics that make today's typical Aussie. According to ABS data, the typical Australian is a 38-year old native-born mum with English ancestry. Here are her full statistics.

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IBM and Nextgen have been blaming each other for the failure of Census 2016. Based on today's Senate Economics References Committee hearing into #CensusFail, it appears both companies were at fault to some extent. Nextgen may have incorrectly implemented geoblocking aimed at mitigating distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks while IBM acknowledged it should have a real test of its router's resilience to failure. But Alastair MacGibbon, the Special Adviser to the Prime Minister on Cyber Security, has laid the blame predominantly on IBM for failing to handle relatively small DDoS attacks that shouldn't have brought down the Census website.

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IBM has been thrown under the bus ever since #CensusFail happened back in August. Big Blue was the IT contractor that was hired to run the Census website, which went down for nearly two days after being hit by repeated distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. IBM's upstream provider for the Census, Nextgen, has since came out and accused IBM of refusing DDoS protection when it offered. IBM has admitted that it did indeed reject Nextgen's DDoS protection solution, and here's why.

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This year's Census was nothing short of a spectacular debacle after the website where Australians were to fill out the survey went down for nearly two days. Last night, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) chief David Kalisch fronted the Senate Estimates in parliament to answer questions about the incident. We found out that the ABS will have to spend around $30 million to fix the damage. He also admitted that the ABS made a number of poor judgement calls for Census 2016. Here's what he had to say along with a recap of what has happened since the Census outage occurred two months ago.

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If you haven't got around to completing the Australian Census yet, you need to do it right now. From September 23, census holdouts will start to receive less-than-friendly visits from the ABS. If you don't have a sufficient excuse for not submiting the form, you could face penalties of up to $180 per day. If you've forgotten your Census login code, are concerned about privacy or have no idea what's going on, here's what you need to know.

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Dear Lifehacker, I never got around to filling out the Australian census on census night (I tried a few times, but the website wasn't working.) I was wondering what the odds are of me actually receiving a fine from the ABS? If they send me a letter and I ignore it, what happens next? Also, does the fact that the website was down on census night mean I'm off the hook?

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Around 48 hours after the Census website was pulled after alleged repeated DDoS attacks, and hundreds of thousands of Aussies actually trying to complete the Census, the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Census website came back to life this afternoon. But, in a move that isn't entirely surprising, the site continues to have issues. It's up, it's down, it's up again...

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Last night's Census was a debacle for Australians trying to fill the survey out online. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), the website suffered repeated distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. The ABS ended up pulling the plug on it. People were furious that they weren't able to get online to submit their forms and worried about the fines they would face for not completing the Census. But there are now doubts as to whether yesterday's Census website fail was really a result of DDoS attacks. Here are the details.

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Last night's Census lived up to its most popular hashtag of #CensusFail, with the online portal shutting down at 7:55pm. The Australian Bureau of Statistics confirmed at 11:00pm that the website would continue to stay down until today, and now the reason has been given -- the site received no less than four denial of service (DDoS) attacks by overseas hackers, according to the ABS.