Tagged With artificial intelligence

Shared from Kotaku

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An AI named Angelina is making games thanks to researchers from the University of Falmouth. With the press of a button, Angelina writes the rules of the game, finds assets and ideas from the internet and then creates a file that works with a stand-alone application.

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If someone showed you a group photo containing your boyfriend or girlfriend, you could probably spot them without much trouble. But what if the photo was from ten years ago? Or what if their face was partially obscured? What if it contained thousands of people? That's when you might need artificial intelligence to help you out.

Chinese tech firm Yitu has perfected its facial recognition AI to such a degree that it can now identify faces faster than humans - even when they are intimately familiar with the face in question. Welcome to the next creepy stage of video surveillance.

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You've probably seen the Watson commercials, where what looks like a sentient box interacts with celebrities like Bob Dylan, Carrie Fisher, and Serena Williams; or doctors; or a young cancer survivor. Maybe you caught the IBM artificial intelligence technology's appearance in H&R Block's Super Bowl commercial starring Jon Hamm. "It is one of the most powerful tools our species has created. It helps doctors fight disease," Hamm says. "It can predict global weather patterns. It improves education for children everywhere. And now we unleash it on your taxes."

Shared from Gizmodo

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Over the last 15 years, Australians have reduced the amount of time spent on physical and routine tasks at work by two hours each week thanks to automation. Retail workers have spent less time ringing up items and more time helping customers, bank employees less time counting banknotes and more time giving financial advice.

And if Australia plays its cards right, we could be making $2.2 trillion from automation by 2030, according to research commissioned by Google.

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Artificial intelligence is infiltrating our daily lives, with applications that curate your phone pics, manage your email, and translate text from any language into another. Google, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft are all heavily researching how to integrate AI into their major services. Soon you'll likely interact with an AI (or its output) every time you pick up your phone. Should you trust it? Not always.

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Zo is the spiritual successor to Microsoft Tay - the artificially intelligent chatbot that famously went into a racist, sexist meltdown in 2016. Zo was built with more sophisticated AI software than its predecessor, which translates to more fluid conversations and less maniacal hate speech. However, it turns out Zo really didn't care for the Life Is Strange video game series - and she doesn't care who knows it.

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Android: If your phone's storage is running low, you might want to start deleting some low-quality photos from your phone or backing it up with an app like Google Photos. Luckily the photo app EyeEm announced an update on Wednesday that uses artificial intelligence to pick out your best photos.

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Computers believe in conspiracy theories now. The New Inquiry's Francis Tseng trained a bot to recognise patterns in photos and draw links between similar pictures, forming the kind of conspiracy-theory diagram seen in the last act of a Homeland episode or the front page of Reddit. It's a cute trick that reminds us that humans are gullible (hey, maybe those photos do match!), and that the machines we train to think for us could end up just as gullible.

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Looking through my RSS feeds, the media releases I receive in my email, and the headlines in the tech press and on social media, there’s one thing that seems to be dominating much of the conversation - artificial intelligence. Some of the applications seem quite interesting, such as the TranslateOne2One. There are others that solve smaller, yet annoying issues, such as the announcement by Slack this morning. But what are the problems we want AI to solve?

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Google has been working on a number of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning projects for some time. Now its looking to bring some of this technology to Raspberry Pi to help the maker community create smart devices.

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai believes that we are moving to an “AI-first” world. In this world, we will be interacting with personal digital assistants on a range of platforms, including through Google’s new intelligent speaker 'Google Home' and other Google-powered devices.