Tagged With voting

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The Electoral College is an integral, if not unusual, part of American democracy. Few other nations have one, and even when they do the system isn't quite the same. How does the Electoral College work and why do they even have one? Our latest video explains.

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After voting in the federal election on Saturday, Australians were told that the final result wouldn't be known until at least Tuesday with the possibility of a hung parliament looking increasingly likely. This interactive infographic from the Conversation breaks down how the numbers are falling across the country, with insights into every key seat.

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On 8 July the nation finally gets to cast its vote in the 2016 federal election. By now you probably have a pretty good idea where each party stands on key election issues -- but one area you may have overlooked is privacy and encryption. If you work in IT, this could have serious ramifications for you industry. This infographic from lobby group Electronic Frontiers Australia (EFA) reveals where each major party stands on surveillance, encryption, copyright issues and censorship.

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In 2015, more than 280,000 votes were received in the New South Wales election from a personal computer or mobile phone. This was the largest-ever binding election to use online voting. But federally, the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters has ruled out allowing Australians to cast their vote online, arguing it risks “catastrophically compromising our electoral integrity”.

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Dear Lifehacker, I like to vote below the line for the senate and number all the boxes. This is so I can make sure certain candidates will never get my vote even with the shady preference deals going on. Last election I used Below The Line to plan my ballot in advance so that on the day, all I had to do was transcribe this onto the paper. However, this handy web app doesn't appear to be available this election. Is there a similarly easy yet functional way to prepare?

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This Saturday, Queensland will decide whether or not to give the Newman government another stab in office. Interestingly, it will also be the first time that Australians are required to show proof-of-identity to cast an ordinary vote. If you live in Queensland, you will need to produce one of the following types of ID to quickly cast your ballot.