Tagged With self marketing

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Become known as an expert in any industry by utilising the tools available to you online. In a particular example illustrated by weblog Dosh Dosh, an art student want to market her skills and become known as an expert in her area of study. It's not that difficult to develop some sort of presence online nowadays, but to become an expert, you need to do a little more. Dosh Dosh writes: To achieve this goal, you need to develop visibility and industry connections. For people to talk about you, they first need to know that you exist. And so it is important to develop visibility in all the right places through an online persona. Building credibility requires establishing a home base online, participating in communities, initiating media outreach, and creating ventures to develop your net worth. Also, to see additional tips on how to manage your online reputation once your presence online is known. How to Use the Web to Build a Powerful Reputation in Any Industry

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Are you happy with the results people get back when they Google your name? If not, there are easy ways to monitor and guide what information is published about you online. Two years ago we covered how to have a say in what Google says about you, and more recently, and how to track down anyone online. But a rash of social media sites have arisen that give you more tools to help you manage your online reputation and become more findable. Let's take a look.

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While some people argue that Twitter is not a productive use of one's time, others strongly disagree. Blogger Maki provides a list of seventeen different things you can do with Twitter to make it worth your while. By actively engaging on Twitter, you can self-market and build your personal brand. This allows you to have a say in what Google knows about you. You can also ask a question and get almost instantaneous feedback from hundreds of people. Twitter is excellent for building a network of friends, for taking notes, for setting up meetings, and for keeping a log of what you do everyday. After reviewing this list, do you still think Twitter is a complete waste? Let's hear your take in the comments.
17 Ways You Can Use Twitter

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Writer Steve Pavlina says that even if you work 9 to 5 for a company, think of yourself as self-employed—and make career moves from that perspective. The only true boss of your work is you. Any external boss is just a customer of your personal services business. Maybe you'll do a great deal of business with a single customer, but you're always free to fire a customer you don't like. Saying "I quit" to your boss is essentially the same as saying to a customer, "I'm sorry, but apparently our business is unable to serve you. Perhaps I can recommend a competitor who may be better equipped to meet your needs." As a former employee and current freelancer, I can attest to what a huge shift in perspective self-employment really requires—making that perceptual leap sooner would've been great for my career as an employee back then. Are you "self-employed" at your job? Tell us about it in the comments. You Are Self-Employed