Security

0

President Trump's campaign chairmen, Paul Manafort, was indicted yesterday and ordered to surrender to authorities. According to the New York Times, he is charged with funelling "millions of dollars through overseas shell companies and the money to buy luxury cars, real estate, antiques and expensive suits." His associate Rick Gates was also charged. The Times notes that this represents "a significant escalation in a special counsel investigation that has cast a shadow over Mr. Trump's first year in office."

1

Virtual private networks (or VPNs) are great for protecting your privacy and data while you browse the web. They provide increased security on public Wi-Fi networks (coffee shops, airports, etc), and prevent ISPs from collecting personal data, data they want to sell to advertisers. VPNs are also pretty good at letting users circumvent location-based content restrictions put in place by companies like YouTube, Spotify and Netflix. While they're not foolproof, here's how to pick a VPN, and boost your chance of enjoying Game Of Thrones without paying Foxtel a dime.

0

No doubt you've Googled yourself at least once to see what comes up (or to see what embarrassing photos and blog posts you need to purge from the web before your boss finds them). While doing a search for yourself might yield some predictable results -- your LinkedIn page, any mentions of you in the local paper, obituaries for other people with the same name -- a conversation with a friend on the topic of data breaches led me to search for something I rarely need to find: my own iCloud email address.

0

iOS/Android: If you're worried about apps tracking your location, it's not enough to limit your location sharing. You need to limit camera-roll sharing too. If you've ever given an app access to your camera roll - to take photos, or store screenshots, or any given reason - you've also let it see where all those photos were taken. Felix Krause, an iOS developer and security writer, built an app to demonstrate this back door.

1

A security researcher has revealed serious flaws in the way that most contemporary Wi-Fi networks are secured. Discovered by Mathy Vanhoef from the University of Leuven, the vulnerability affects the protocol “Wi-Fi Protected Access 2”. Otherwise known as WPA2, this encrypts the connection between a computer or mobile phone and a Wi-Fi access point to keep your browsing safe.

Because this security can be cracked, it’s possible for someone to read what is transmitted on the network, allowing them to intercept passwords or credit card details, or to inject malicious code when users visit websites. Fortunately, there are some steps you can take to keep your internet traffic safe.

4

A huge flaw in Wi-Fi devices using WPA and WPA2 security encryption was exposed by Mathy Vanhoef, working out of KU Leuven, yesterday. Attackers can use this flaw to steal sensitive data – passwords, credit card numbers, emails – or inject malicious software into websites. If you’re using an Android device, an attack could be “exceptionally devastating”.

Here’s what you need to know.

0

A serious Wi-Fi vulnerability was revealed yesterday, affecting nearly every Wi-Fi network and device using WPA or WPA2 security encryption. The Wi-Fi exploit, first reported by Ars Technica, takes advantage of a particular security flaw in the WPA2 wireless security standard, allowing attackers to intercept personal data as well as insert malware into websites a user visited.

Attackers can potentially gain access to encrypted information like usernames, passwords, and credit card data. Luckily, companies are already patching the flaw in order to prevent this potential hack from happening, but you'll need to do a little work on your end and update your devices.

Shared from Gizmodo

1

Your home Wi-Fi might not be as secure as you think. WPA2 -- the de facto standard for Wi-Fi password security worldwide -- may have been compromised, with huge ramifications for almost all of the Wi-Fi networks in our homes and businesses as well as for the networking companies that build them. Details are still sketchy as the story develops, but it's looking like a new method called KRACK -- for Key Reinstallation AttaCK -- is responsible.

0

Even when you're covering your tracks by opening a new incognito window, your web browsing history might not be as private as you think. Information about what you do online, down to every single URL, can likely be purchased on the web by anyone who wants it. And while in most cases people are making those purchases for marketing reasons, they could choose to use their newfound knowledge maliciously as well.

11

Magpie season is currently in full swing (or should that be swoop?) with dozens of parks and playgrounds descending into avian war zones. But just because something is scary doesn't mean you should believe everything you hear. Here are five bogus magpie myths that the nation needs to debunk.

22

America has experienced yet another mass shooting, this time at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on the strip in Las Vegas, Nevada. It is reportedly the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history.

As a criminologist, I have reviewed recent research in hopes of debunking some of the common misconceptions I hear creeping into discussions that spring up whenever a mass shooting occurs. Here’s some recent scholarship about mass shootings that should help you identify misinformation when you hear it.