Security

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If your efforts to track down long-lost relatives and obscure musicians (or anyone else you're looking for on the web) stop at Googling their name, you've come to the right place. Here's how to seriously go about searching for people online, including some advice from the professionals who do it for a living. Oh, and if you'd rather not be found yourself, than read on to understand exactly how the pros go about finding those who'd prefer to stay hidden.

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Anti-fascist action, more popularly known as “antifa”, can be best described as international socialism on amphetamines. Driven by progressive ideology and “workers’ rights”, it has adopted violence and intimidation as a tactic to quash conservatives and nationalists – in Australia, Europe and, most recently, the US.

Antifa, or militant progressives, have always existed and flourished in democracies. Militant progressives were part of the the 1960s and 1970s counter-culture, and were active during the anti-globalisation protests of the 1990s and 2000s.

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Apple's upcoming iPhone 8 will probably let you unlock it with facial recognition, and security experts tell Mashable that's a terrible idea. Current facial recognition technology, like the kind that unlocks a Samsung Galaxy S8, can be fooled by a photo. Samsung pretends this is no big deal, but this gimmick creates a false sense of security that many consumers won't know is about as secure as "swipe to unlock".

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Australian pirates have just been put on notice. The chairman for Creative Content Australia - a consortium of rights holders that counts Foxtel, Village Roadshow and the Australian Screen Association (ASA) among its members - has issued a stern warning to anyone who continues to access pirated content. In short, you can expect to be sued this year.

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On Tuesday, Techcrunch writer John Biggs had his phone number stolen by a hacker who gained control of Biggs' T-Mobile SIM card, granting him access to Biggs' phone number used to verify his identity. Biggs correctly employed SMS-based two-factor authentication on his accounts, but forgot to add extra security layers to his wireless carrier account. His attacker proceeded to lock him out of his accounts and attempt to demand ransom in bitcoin.

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It is the most common way in the world to connect an external device to your computer, and now Australian research shows the humble USB is actually super vulnerable to information "leakage" - making them far less secure than we thought.

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It’s no secret that Google knows a lot about its users. The tech giant collects tons of data about you, including your search history, location, and voice searches that help improve Google’s services and provide relevant ads. However, you might be surprised to know Google can easily take a look at all of the data it has on you. Here's how you can find out what the tech giant knows about your online habits and personal information.

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You probably think you know how to keep your internet habits secret. "Clearing browser history is too obvious," you say. "I just do all my sketchy stuff in an incognito window!" OK, hot stuff, then let me ask you this: You ever search anything weird on Instagram? Got any visits to an ex's Twitter profile that you might not want to share with the next friend or loved one who grabs your phone? "I've gotta show you this adorable Japanese puppy's account... Why do your recent searches look like Armie Hammer's?"

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Virtual private networks (VPNs) have many legitimate purposes. They're also used to cheekily circumvent geo-blocks on overseas sites like US Netflix - often against the express wishes of rights holders. Like most online technologies, government legislation is currently a bit vague on what is and isn't allowed. So is it legal to stream restricted content through a VPN? Let's find out.

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Most internet users wouldn't want to share their browsing history with the rest of the world. (It's one of the reasons incognito mode is so popular.) This is especially true of people who look at questionable online material. So what would you be willing to pay if someone had a secret recording of you watching porn, taken on your webcam?

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The US government recently revamped its password recommendations, abandoning its endorsement of picking a favourite phrase and replacing a couple characters with symbols, like c4tlo^eR. These short, hard-to-read passwords look complicated to humans but very very simple to computers.