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Big news for lovers of the iPhone SE, a franken-gadget made of old Apple parts and billed as a more affordable iOS device: It appears that the budget iPhone lineup is finally going to get its first refresh two years after the original model hit the market. The announcement could come as early as WWDC in June. In fact, Apple might be announcing several new iPhones.

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It was recently confirmed that the new Gmail will contain a 'Confidential Mode' which will allow users send emails that will be destroyed after a set period of time.

This is cool and all, but there are still significant questions that need to be answered around compatibility and security.

The good news is that there are a bunch of alternative email clients that offer far more features and privacy.

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Bitcoin has been on a volatile ride in recent times, its value rising and falling like a kite caught in variable winds.

Its future will likely be as unpredictable as its past given that it’s a currency propped up by risk-takers, a target of lawmakers and tied to nothing more substantial than an algorithm.

But there are certain variables and concurrent conditions that are signals worth watching when considering Bitcoin’s future.

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If a game doesn't work as advertised, Australian consumer law offers gamers plenty of recourse when it comes to getting a refund. But if you pre-order a game and change your mind - say you need the money back, or you've had a change of heart - the consumer protections are very different.

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You're at work, or on the other side of the world, or both, and you need something from your computer at home - in years gone by, you would need an IT degree and an expensive software package to connect up to your home computer remotely, but now a number of apps will do the job, simply and free. Here are three of our favourites, and when you might want to use them.

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Shadow Minister For Communications Michelle Rowland gave a speech today at the Commsday Summit which covered Labor's position on the digital divide, 5G, and digital inclusion.

Rowland called out Australia's "great complacency" – the "she'll be right" attitude that assumes because we have prospered in the past, "it must inevitably continue".

Rowland also went into significant detail about the NBN, and it was way more fun than it had any right to be. Here's everything that was said.

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Last year, I spent a chunk of time playing around with different browsers. Microsoft Edge, much to much dismay, got a run for a couple of weeks. I mucked around with the early days of the Firefox Quantum beta. And then, just like everyone else, I went back to Chrome.

But even though I returned to the home of Google, I've still been angling for something different. And over the last few weeks, I found myself using Firefox more and more, until the browser finally became my default option across all platforms.

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If you were concerned about Facebook tracking your every move, do I have news for you that will just make your day - or not.

Surprise! You're constantly being tracked by almost every platform online. But we're here to help you, for just five easy monthly payments of $49.95 - nah just kidding here's some free advice, my friends. Run, be free.

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It's been in the works for nearly a year and Google's great ad-pocalypse is now upon us. The Chrome browser has begun to automatically filter out ads that don't meet certain quality standards. As a result, your browsing experience is about to change a little bit. Here's what you need to know.

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This week, news of massive security vulnerabilities afflicting every modern model of Intel processor went public, even as developers for practically every major platform frantically rushed to roll out fixes. Much more information has now become available about Meltdown and Spectre, a group of attack methods malicious parties could use to break into some of the most sensitive inner workings of any device using the affected CPUs.

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There's small screwups and big screwups. Here is tremendously huge screwup: Virtually all Intel processors produced in the last decade have a major security hole that could allow "normal user programs - from database applications to JavaScript in web browsers - to discern to some extent the layout or contents of protected kernel memory areas," the Register reports.