Tagged With wearables

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Last week, we were given a sneak peak at Halo: a new contactless payment system from Bankwest that puts your banking details into a ring. Boasting batteryless, app-free operation and waterproofing up to 50 metres, it's the first "IoT wearable" concept that I'm actually exited about.

It's also one of the cheapest wearables on the market, with an introductory price of $29. Here's what you need to know!

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After months of leaks and hints, Fibit has finally revealed its newest wrist wearable: The $US300 ($379) Fitbit Ionic. Fitbit claims up to four days of battery life, a refined OS that pairs nicely with devices running iOS, Android, and Windows, and a brand new sensor for tracking your heart rate. This smartwatch, which visually calls to mind the lovechild of an Apple Watch and a Fitbit Surge, is a natural progression for the huge wearable company. Just last year, it snapped up notable smartwatch makers Pebble and Vector for a reported $US38 ($48) million. And between the almost-perfect Surge and the incredibly unattractive Blaze, Fitbit has been interested in the smartwatch sector of the wearable market for a while. This is the culmination of that interest. It's profoundly ugly -- like every Fitbit that's come before, but it could be technologically cool enough that you might not care.

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Wearable tech is still finding its feet in the market. While there are some clear use-cases such as in health and exercise for smartwatches, and in security in the case of cameras, there's still quite a bit of scepticism when it comes to many of the devices on the market. Despite that lack of clear use-cases, Gartner forecasts the number of wearable tech devices in the market to almost double by 2021.

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You've got data pouring in from your connected fitness tracker, your smartphone, your smartwatch, the smart scales in your bathroom and the dieting app you use to log your meals -- so how do you get all of this information in one place? It isn't easy, but here are a few pointers to help.

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When you buy an Apple product you buy into the ecosystem more than with any other company, but that doesn't mean you're stuck with only what they offer. If you're a lover of wearables you'd be remiss to overlook Android Wear, even if you've chosen iOS as your primary mobile platform.

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With the original Microsoft Band never seeing release in Australia, the Band 2 is going to be our first glimpse of Microsoft's wearable technology. While it can access email, messages and call alerts, the Band is far more fitness tracker than smartwatch, unlike Apple or Samsung's wearable offerings. So is there any advantage to getting the Microsoft Band 2 over one of the forerunners of the industry like the Fitbit or one of Garmin's fitness trackers?

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For the past few years, wearables have been tipped as the "Next Big Thing" to hit the technology market. Unfortunately, the reality has failed to meet expectations due to a glut of overpriced products that lacked style and functionality. In the second half of the year, this could finally be set to change. This week, the biggest names in mobile computing converged on Mobile World Congress 2015 to unveil their latest wearable creations. Here are the highlights.

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Android Wear has only been out for a couple of months and we've only just started to scratch the surface of what can be done with it. However, if you're an early adopter and have already jumped on board, here are some of the most useful apps to get you started.