Tagged With typing

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I have a problem with my MacBook's poorly designed keyboard, one I know Apple isn't going to solve for me. On older MacBook keyboards, the arrow keys were identical in size, with two empty spaces to the left and right of the top arrow key that provided a tactile reference point and clear delineator between full-size keys and the half-size arrow keys. On the newest MacBooks, the left and right arrow keys are full-size keys, and get rid of that handy empty space.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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Mechanical keyboards -- keyboards with full, individual switches under every key -- have exploded in popularity recently, although the technology inside is as old as the keyboard itself. There's really no substitute for that solid, clicking sensation under your fingers as you type, and the satisfying sound each key makes when you press it. However, choosing the best mechanical keyboard can be tricky, since there are dozens of models sporting different switch types, and more popping up every day. Here's how to tell them all apart and pick the right one for you.

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With the recent acquisition by Facebook of voice-recognition company Wit.ai, all four major players in the post-PC market (Apple, Google, Microsoft and Facebook) now have a significant infrastructure for hands-free communication with your device. But what will that mean for our communication with our devices? Is voice just another method to talk to your computer, or are we on the cusp of a revolution in computer communication?

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Repetitive strain injury, or RSI, is a term which was developed to describe an epidemic of work-related arm and hand pain reported in Australia in the 1980s. While work-related arm and hand pain was and still is common, this particular epidemic was unusual in that it involved workers not previously considered as being at risk.

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Dear Lifehacker, As I near the end of my university degree and prepare to enter the corporate workforce, I am acutely aware of my lack of touch-typing skills. I know I should have learnt at some point, but laziness and the heady lifestyle of university got in the way. I've recently been reading about the Dvorak keyboard, and its supposed benefits when compared to the traditional QWERTY layout. Should I learn to type on the Dvorak in a bid to reach higher speeds faster? Or should I stick with the slower, yet universally used, QWERTY? Thanks, Incompetent Typist