Tagged With terminal tip

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The default prompt in Windows' Command Prompt isn't the easiest to read, but Microsoft has a font, Consolas, that works much better in a terminal, as attested to by our commenters. The Digital Inspiration blog runs down how to set Consolas as the default font in your command prompt. Vista users can perform a registry hack to enable their pre-installed Consolas, but XP users without Office 2007 can download the PowerPoint viewer to grab all the Vista fonts. Hit the link for installation and registry-tweaking instructions.

Change the Font of Command Prompt Window to Consolas For More Comfortable Reading

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Working with the command line can save time, but most of us non-programmers know only a few key commands to use. Using the apropos command, however, anyone can search for commands and programs that relate to whatever keyword you search for. If, for instance, you knew you had a video encoder handy but didn't quite know how to get at it, type in apropos mpeg and you'll get a list of commands and programs that have the words "mpeg" in their man, or manual, files. Great tip for beginners and terminal hackers alike, and apropos is installed on a wide number of Linux distros and other terminals. For more beginner help, check out Unix resources for newbies.

Use apropos to find the command you're looking for

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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Linux only: Loading a terminal session doesn't seem to take all that long—until you have to do it many, many times each day. Luckily, the program Yakuake offers up a lightning-quick terminal that rolls down, gets the job done and packs away, all with a tap of F12 (or any other hot key). Yakuake is KDE-based and a snap to install for Kubuntu users, but GNOME-based systems such as Ubuntu can add it with very little fuss (transparencies might require more work, however).

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If you're sick of opening a new terminal window for every application, GNU Screen is here to save the day. It's a simple little program that comes pre-installed in Linux, BSD, and Mac OS X, and it allows you to page through multiple console applications from the same terminal window. Imagine reading your mail, editing text, and running a sorting application—all from the same terminal on your desktop! To get started, just type "screen" at the command line prompt. You'll get a welcome screen, and then you'll hit return. It looks like you've been taken back to the prompt, but now you're in GNU Screen. Start an application, like a text editor. Then hit ctrl-a, followed by letter c. This creates a new window (you'll see a new command prompt). Start your next application, then hit ctrl-a, followed by p. Now you've paged back to your previous window, with the text editor. Presto, two terminals in one! But wait, there's more.