Tagged With tech support

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It’s tech security PSA time. A recent story in The New York Times provided fascinating insight into the ongoing evolution and expansion of fake tech support scams. The “classic” routine, where a window pops onto your computer screen offering technical support for a “virus” or other urgent problem you didn’t know about, has not only stayed in circulation — it’s a growth industry.

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Back when I was a uni student, I used to do tech support on the side. And I saw things. I wasn't the only one. The people who work tech have heard every excuse and seen every horror your mind can conjure. Here are seven things you should never say to an IT staff member trying to fix your computer.

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Yesterday was Pi Day, and what better way to celebrate everyone's favourite mathematical constant than by taking a look back at everyone's favourite cheap hobbyist computer, the Raspberry Pi. Since the launch of the Raspberry Pi, I've written an absurd number of guides, blogs and an already outdated book on the variety of projects you can do with it. I've learned a lot it that time.

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If you're the family tech support, you probably have to record the occasional screencast to show people how to troubleshoot. Chances are, you don't need special screencasting software just for that. Digital Inspiration shows a clever way to just use YouTube.

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Duplicate files can cause all kinds of problems on your computer, taking up precious storage room, confusing your photo or media manager apps, and generally getting in the way of searches and other operations when you’d rather they didn’t. You don’t have to accept duplicate files as an inevitability of running a PC, though: Here’s how to get rid of them.

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Working in IT is no picnic. You're overworked, over-stressed and overwhelmed by an onslaught of stupidity from Luddite customers and colleagues. We recently asked our readers to share their worst experiences from the front lines of IT. Your stories were so terrifying that we may need to wipe and reboot our brains to recover. Here are some of the worst.

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Dear Lifehacker, My parents don't know much about computers. They're barely able to operate their PVR. I'm always the one they call for help. While I don't mind helping some of the time, I think it would be better if they learnt a few skills of their own. How can I bring my parents into the technical age without frying their brains?

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If you're away from family, being able to video call using Skype or other free services is a great way to stay in touch. But can you teach them to use it if they've barely touched a computer before and shirk at the thought of a no-features mobile?

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Dear Lifehacker, My mother just got a new computer. She's eager to learn, but we're starting from scratch. How can I give her some tools to learn on her own so I don't need to hover over her while she explores every menu and every option? Sadly, I don't have the time to really teach her, but I'd love to help her teach herself, and don't want her to not ask me if she has problems. Please help!