Tagged With security

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Cybersecurity company Endgame , which provides security solutions for preventing attacks and detecting threats, has released a large data set that can be used for training AI-based security systems. In a research paper they recently published, Endgame's Hyrum S Anderson and Phil Roth describe EMBER - a "benchmark dataset for training machine learning models to statically detect malicious Windows portable executable files".

Shared from Gizmodo

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If you were concerned about Facebook tracking your every move, do I have news for you that will just make your day - or not.

Surprise! You're constantly being tracked by almost every platform online. But we're here to help you, for just five easy monthly payments of $49.95 - nah just kidding here's some free advice, my friends. Run, be free.

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Having to remember dozens, or even hundreds of passwords could become a thing of the past. The W3C has published a new API, that is at the Release Candidate stage, that will let web browsers use biometric information stored in smartphones. Chrome, Edge and Firefox will be supporting Webauthn, with Chrome and Firefox announcing support will be part of the releases made in May this year.

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In a couple of weeks, security experts from around the world will be converging on the Moscone Center in San Francisco for the annual RSA Conference. I've been a few times and its quite overwhelming with the entire city filled with infosec companies. Accompanying the event, every major analyst firm and security vendor releases their annual security report, telling us what they've learned over the least year. This year, there's one new thing that's hitting the headlines.

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Facebook has rolled out a number of changes to APIs used by developers for things like accessing events, group administration, page management and using Facebook for logging into to other apps and services. And while the changes are another step in the road to tying down rogue apps, it's not all smooth sailing.

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In the midst of the current scandal rocking Facebook, many people are wondering whether they should stay on the social network and exactly what data Facebook has. It turns out, some of the information Facebook gathers is, frankly, quite scary.

I downloaded my Facebook history and was amazed, perhaps shocked is a better word, at what was in my profile - personal information that others thought was hidden. Here's how to access your full history and how to look through it.

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Facebook is kind of a mess right now. And there are plenty of equally messy reaction pieces cajoling you and everyone you know, to delete your account in a massive middle finger to the web's prevailing social network. That's the easy take and, honestly, we've experienced this mob response before. Did you #DeleteFacebook then? Me neither.

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With Facebook embroiled in a massive data harvesting and privacy abuse scandal, following the Cambridge Analytica revelations, now is a good time to revisit all your Facebook security settings and think about what you're sharing on the world's most dominant social network. Here's our guide to Facebook security and privacy.

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It's been almost two years since the Australian government launched its cyber-security strategy for the nation. Unlike many documents coming from Canberra, this one came with funding so the proposed initiatives in the strategy had some chance of actually happening. Today, another part of that strategy came to fruition with Sydney joining Brisbane, Perth and Melbourne with its own Joint Cyber Security Centre.

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Like many people, I've had an account with Adobe for many years. That account has been used for downloading free software, a Creative Cloud subscription and for using the company's cloud services. I don't use the software anymore and have no use for their online services - which is more about my needs than a statement about their service quality.

But when I decided to delete my account this week I hit an unexpected hurdle. There's no option for a user to delete their own account.

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Hi Lifehacker. When I was looking for browsers I discounted a lot because I didn't know who made them and what information they collected and how trustworthy they are. Could a dodgy company be selling information I entered into my browser, or my browsing history? Should I reconsider Opera? How do all these companies making browsers make money?

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Just over a week ago, the Reserve Bank of Australia released the all new $50 note. The $50 is the most highly circulated bank note in this country as it's used to fill ATMs. And highly circulated notes have traditionally been attractive to counterfeiters as they can pass fakes more easily as there are so many notes, at different stages of wear in circulation. But the new "pineapple" is different to its predecessor. And the makers of some of its security features, Leonhard Kurz Australia, say it's almost impossible to copy.

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Machine learning is changing the way systems are being designed and how we process information. That's true in security as well. But can a ML-based approach protect us when dealing with attack vectors and exploits that haven't been seen before? I spoke with Cylance's VP for engineering, Milind Karnik.

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Researchers at malware and security software testing company AV-TEST have discovered 139 samples of malware that "appear to be related to recently reported CPU vulnerabilities." Although most of the samples they discovered seem to be based on proof-of-concept software created by security researchers the number of unique samples is on the rise.

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The Federal government is going to spin revelations of the leaked Cabinet papers in lots of ways. But the entire matter comes down to a simple fact. Information security might be backed by technology in many cases. But all the best tech in the world isn't worth a pinch of salt if humans cock things up.

This leak, which will cause great embarrassment in government and opposition ranks, is the fault of people who simply didn't do their jobs.