Tagged With productivity

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Starting a new job can be fun and exciting. If you're lucky, you can keep everything you do within the confines of the office. But let's be realistic: You're probably going to be working from home a little bit, either playing catch-up or sipping delicious drinks while you take advantage of your company's "you don't have to physically show up" policies.

As your personal and work lives start to intertwine, it can be tricky to manage the balance across your various devices. Here's how I did it.

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The hardest part of doing most things is just starting. We often think about what a big project we have ahead of ourselves, and that's what makes it so daunting to begin. I know when I was writing my book, it seemed like most of my day was spent fighting the agony of just getting started. It was hard to ignore just how big a project it was.

Thankfully, I've found a great hack for getting started. It's called The 10-Minute Hack.

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There's a lot to do. There always is. You sit at your desk well past quittin' time each day to ensure it gets all done, but in the end you suffer for it. It's OK to leave work on time, and these tips can help you make it a habit.

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"Women almost never become art monsters because art monsters only concern themselves with art, never mundane things," writes Jenny Offill in her novel Dept of Speculation. "Nabokov didn't even fold his own umbrella. Vera licked his stamps for him." Women, instead, are forced to "balance" work and life.

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When we think of leadership qualities, we generally think of the ability to rally the troops, a clarity of vision, and the willingness to coax the best work out of each team member. What we don't tend to think of is self-awareness. Self-awareness, in fact, has a certain new-age ring to it - what leader is lying on her hemp bedspread, staring at the ceiling and thinking deeply about whether she truly understands her innermost self?

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As we have argued in the past, email is not the problem - we are. And it's not just the productivity drain or the antisocial effects of constantly checking our phones and computers for new messages.

There are psychological ramifications too. By constantly looking for new information and tasks from other people, we are degrading the importance of the things we want and need to do. This flowchart explains what you're doing wrong - and how to fix it.

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iOS: EasilyDo is a new app that aims to be a central hub for all of those personal things you need to do but would rather have technology do for you. It can clean up your contacts, let you know when to leave for your next appointment, give you directions and dial into conference calls.

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Many of us consider ourselves either a morning person or a night owl -- times when we feel more productive, awake and think better. However, not all types of thinking tasks fit in with what we consider the optimal time of day for us. The Creativity Post points out that creativity happens when you least expect it.

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The to-do list is an inescapable, age-old productivity tool. It is our very human attempt to create order in our disorderly lives and an expression of our ability to impose self-control. Most of us, including to-do list haters, keep one, and so do 63 per cent of professionals, according to a LinkedIn survey released earlier this year. And yet to-do lists seem particularly difficult to tame. iDoneThis' Janet Choi explains why to-do lists fail, and how to use it to your advantage.