Tagged With start-ups

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Microsoft has announced that Sydney will become the location of the eighth Microsoft ScaleUp program technology startups. Other ScaleUp cities include Seattle, Beijing, Berlin, and London. The new initiative was officially opened by the NSW Premier, the honourable Gladys Berejiklian, today. Microsoft also recently announced that Sydney-based Annie Parker, the former CEO of Fishburners and co-founder of muru-D, has been appointed to lead Microsoft’s startup programs globally, including Microsoft ScaleUp.

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One of the biggest roadblocks holding us all back from that awesome business idea is the belief that we don't have enough money. Enough money to kickstart the project, enough money to keep it going and enough money in profits to make it worthwhile. We asked an expert about how to overcome the financial pitfalls that often face budding entrepreneurs.

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EnergyAustralia, Spotless Group, Amazon Web Services, Cisco and the Victorian Government are working together to create a new start accelerator that will focus on the some of the disruptive forces hitting our power system. I worked in the power industry for ten years and can tell you this is the sort of thing this highly conservative industry really needs.

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Every year or so, in order to probably distract us from their complete cluelessness when it comes to digital innovation, Australian governments tell us how they plan to support technology companies buy creating our local answer to California’s Silicon Valley. At a recent conference, I had the chance to ask a panel of four senior managers and leaders of Silicon Valley unicorns what they thought governments could do to create environments where tech start ups can flourish.

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A good product can't guarantee the success of a start-up; but it's not all about luck either. According to CreativeHQ, a group that has been guiding start-ups for over a decade, there are critical elements that can determine whether a start-up will survive and thrive. Conversely, there are also clear alarm bells for when a start-up needs to be shelved (referred to by CreativeHQ as "drowning the puppies"). Read on to find out more.

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There's a well-known adage that nine out of 10 start-ups fail. In my time at Leading Teams, my observation is that start-ups frequently fail in their early days, and fail for lots of reasons. But the one we typically don’t hear about is how the team play an important role in ensuring success. And yet CB insights cited that 'lacking the right team' was the third most important reason why start-ups fail, covering a quarter (23 per cent) of the 101 postmortems reviewed earlier this year. Having the dream team and establishing the right company culture is crucial for any start-up or small business to ensure its longevity. Here are few tips for those who want to get started.

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Tell a child that things should be done a certain way and you'll likely be greeted with a puzzled looked followed by the question "Why?". As we grow older, we start losing that sense of curiosity and wonder, preferring the comfort of the status quo and accepting the "normal" way of doing things. Many start-ups have cropped up to challenge that status quo in established industries. One start-up founder talks about how maintaining a childish naivety has helped his company achieve unprecedented success against the odds.

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Most start-ups rely on using technology to disrupt the market in their chosen industry. Even if your start-up doesn't deal with technology at its core, it would likely involve the use of a mobile app. So can you get away with a founding start-up team with no background in technology? According to a seasoned business investor, the answer is "no". Here's why.

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The mere mention of "start-ups" conjures images of successful businesses like Uber and Atlassian; companies where their founders turned simple ideas into multimillion dollar ventures. We're overwhelmed by coverage of start-ups that do make it big, which has encouraged more people to join the fray and create their own businesses. But the reality is most of them won't make it big and playing in the start-up game is like entering the lottery; a very expensive lottery. So how do you know when you should bow out? We put this question to a group of start-ups and a venture capitalist.