Tagged With sous vide

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The words “that’s too much garlic” have never escaped my lips. Garlic should be added with wild abandon to recipes — one should double, if not triple the suggested amount — but, if that recipe is of the sous vide kind, you should definitely, without a doubt, cook the garlic before it goes into the bag.

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Slow-cooked pork belly is pretty hard to improve upon. The uncured bacon steak is meaty and tender, with melty portions of delicious pork fat running through. It’s already indulgent, but you should make it even more so by giving it a sweet and crackly brûlée crust.

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Try as I might to act as though I am immune to the aggressively cloying nature of February 14, I actually kind of dig Valentine’s Day. Maybe it’s because my particular brand of anxiety is soothed by a brightly coloured and visually uniform supermarket display, but it’s probably thanks to my love of chocolate.

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As of two minutes ago, I have 17 different types of salt in my kitchen, including a Jacobsen sampler (which I am methodically working my way through) and a packet of THC-infused stuff (which I have not tried). I love all of my salty sons dearly, but the Diamond Crystal Kosher and flaky Maldon get far more use than anyone else—the DC is for cooking; Maldon is for finishing.

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I am all about a holiday ham, particularly when accompanied by a sticky-sweet glaze. The salty, fatty slices of pork taste good without much fussing on your part. Since all spiral-cut hams you’ll find in the store are already cooked, all you have to to do is heat them up.

The key, of course, is not drying it out while doing so.

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My grandfather was an eater of many meats - even possum — but he did not care for the texture of wild boar. His recipe for wild boar stew was simple: cook the boar with various vegetables, then “throw the meat in the garbage and keep the broth.” It is worth noting that he was not exactly the cook of the family, but the fact remains that feral pig can be quite tough if not cooked with care.

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Hot dogs are the ultimate easy crowd pleaser. They're already cooked, so you don't have to worry about poisoning anyone, and even the most picky youth can rarely resist a good dog.

"Dirty water dogs" - the ones you get from a cart that sit in a vat of salty water - may seem like a treat you can only get on the streets of big US cities but, with an immersion circulator, you can get very close to the real thing at home.

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As someone who lives in a tiny studio apartment, I don't get to do a lot of grilling, smoking, or any other outdoor cooking. This makes me very sad, because I do love smoked and grilled meats. (Grilled vegetables are also fantastic, but we're not talking about those right now.) Fortunately, a sous vide setup - which I happen to have! - can help you come close to the texture and flavour you get from low and slow smoking.

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Pre-cooked spiral cut hams -- also known as "city hams" -- were always my favourite part of Easter. Since there is no danger of undercooking, we're free to focus flavour. Heating and serving may seem simple enough, but you can overdo it in the oven. This leads to a dry, chewy pork product, and nobody wants that. Easter may be over - but how can you make your pre-cooked ham taste better?

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The most important part of the egg bite is (obviously) the egg mixture. Yes, the fillings are more exciting, but they are also endless, and you should be free to fill your bites with whatever meats, cheeses and vegetables you wish to devour. As such, I though it was more important to focus on the eggs and dairy components and let you choose your own adventure, fillings-wise.

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I am an absolute fool for a good charcuterie board, and enjoy all of their offerings, from the super-hard salumi to the spreadable and whipped liver mousse. But there is something special about a terrine which, at its best, is a harmonious amalgamation of flavours, textures and (of course) meats.

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I do not have a baby, but I have a sous vide circulator (the light of my life), and I assume that other people who own sous vide circulators might one day procreate. (Or maybe they already have!) For these offspring-having, sous-vide-savvy home cooks, I have great news: You can use your sous vide setup to warm breast milk and baby formula to the perfect 37C, without fear of overheating it.