Tagged With social gps

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Getting diagnosed with a serious illness that requires a lot of medical intervention is an extremely stressful experience. There’s a lot to navigate, and as the friend, family member or even casual acquaintance of someone going through a difficult health scenario, you want to help ease the burden, not make it worse. Here’s what you should and shouldn’t say to someone who is ill.

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It’s good to recognise what’s good in your life (even, and especially, when it seems as though the rest is terrible). But if you express that in the form of gratitude journals, prayers or meditation, you’re sort of making that feeling a solitary one. What about the people in your life you’re truly thankful for? Couldn’t you tell them how you feel?

Well, no, a lot of us might say. That sounds super awkward.

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Taking someone’s photo without their consent and posting it on the internet is a crappy thing to do. It’s invasive, inappropriate, and can even put the other person in danger. In a world that made any sense, this wouldn’t require further explanation. This would be a commonly understood part of the social contract.

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Whether it's a hot new movie, a huge sports event, or a TV show that it feels like everyone is watching, it's no fun to be caught out of the loop during water cooler chats or party conversations. If you want to be a part of it all, let go of your pride and ask some dumb questions about it.

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Although concerts can be transcendental experiences that inspire collectivism unlike anything else on this earth, anyone who's been to a show has at least one story about another audience member tainting the experience with some form of disruptive behaviour.

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There's a lot of pressure to stand out on a first date, and that stress inevitably carries over to your wardrobe choices. But there's no need to have a silly outfit changing montage before you head out to meet someone for the first time. Comfortable, casual staples like a good pair of jeans are all you need.

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Nobody likes someone who interrupts people all the time. It's rude and it actually thwarts clear communication from happening. Some of us interrupters, though, are aware of our problem and tired of being the jerk who cuts people off. Here are a few tricks for shutting yourself down.

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In "How to Email Busy People", startup founder Jason Freedman gives several good tips on getting what you want from busy and important people. The most crucial tip, as quoted today by designer Tina Roth Eisenberg, is to be explicit instead of coy.

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When I was in high school, I found out that my friends didn't like me. One of the girls in my "group" told me I wasn't invited to a birthday party because "everyone" thought I was annoying — which, to be honest, at 15 I probably was — and for months I was ostracised. It took some time for me to worm my way back into the gang, but until then, I was devastated and I swore I would spend the rest of my life being likeable.

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Puns have long been the ugly stepchildren of comedy, derided for generations as the dull weapon of choice of trying-too-hard dads and uncles. But what was once considered the lowest form of humour has quietly risen in the ranks, and in recent years, the pun has gotten a makeover. Thanks to the rise of competitive punning events, including Brooklyn's seven-year old Punderdome event, punning has started to resemble something like art, or at least colourful graffiti.

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In comedic improvisation, the principle of "yes and" means that first you agree with your partner's premise, and then you add to it. Without this essential principle, the scene couldn't go anywhere. And while applying "yes and" to real life is a bit of a business-world cliché, I've found that it's a great way to redirect potential arguments into jovial banter, and keep everyone on the same team.