Tagged With selfies

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You may have noticed the historic-artwork-selfie craze sweeping the web right now, comparing faces to famous paintings and art from around the world. You might be wondering "what historic piece of work does my face resemble?" and "how do I find out?"

Well, both of those questions can be answered simply - by using Google's Arts and Culture app.

Shared from Gizmodo

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What comes to mind when you think of Millennials? If we are to believe what we read, we're looking at a generation of lazy, selfish, entitled and image-obsessed 18–30 year olds, more intent on eating smashed avo and showing it off on Instagram than, well, anything else.

Now science is aiming to smash that stigma, and this first-of-it's-kind experiment has shown those headlines have it all wrong.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Shared from Gizmodo

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Dear Lifehacker, I'm interested in getting a camera that has a remote control to take self-portraits. What do you recommend? I don’t mind something easy to use, it doesn’t need to be super high-tech, and I don’t like bulky cameras. Also is there some sort of mini tripod that goes with the camera? One I can put on a desk. Or do I need a regular tripod? I'm on a budget, I can spend maybe up to $2k all up? Eek, is that impossible?

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The rise of the selfie has driven a rift into society, bringing up a surprising number of issues over gender, class, age, religion and race. Wired's Jason Parham explores some of these in "When the Selfie Turns Sacrilegious", an essay on taking selfies in sacred or serious places such as mosques and art installations.

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In my salad days I posted some supremely unflattering selfies. I was a photo newbie, a bearded amateur mugging for the camera. I'm happy to say that the results of my self-portraits (shared below purely for educational purposes, of course) have improved through experience, but if I had a ruthless robot telling me where I was going wrong it would have been a lot easier. Luckily, the magic of machine learning is now upon us, and it's here to tell us how to take a good selfie.

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As a solo traveller, it's challenging to capture my adventures: I want to include myself in the picture and I'm not about to use a comically long selfie stick. I also rarely feel comfortable handing my camera or phone to strangers. But that doesn't mean I'm about to miss out on social media-worthy moments. Instead, I re-imagined how I took selfies.

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In today's era of Instagram filters and one-touch beauty modes, taking a flattering self portrait has never been easier. Unfortunately, some of the artistry - and most of the originality - can be lost in the process.

If you want to create "selfies" that are unique, eye-catching and personal, you're going to need more than a front-facing phone camera. With that in mind, we asked three professional photographers to share their advice on self-portraiture. Here are their ten best tips.

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People who take selfies are vain, narcissistic and self-absorbed. I don't understand the point. Is it for attention? Validation? Are you hooked on how many "likes" you get? Get over yourself. I've always hated selfies -- so I decided to take one every single day for a year.

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The modern obsession with selfies has catapulted Facebook and Instagram into two of the most successful apps of all time. If you're outgoing, under the age of 40 and remotely attractive, you've probably taken a few yourself. For some people, the aforementioned behavior is indicative of an undesirable personality trait; namely narcissism. This infographic looks at the chief warning signs.

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A popular selfie tip is to raise your camera above your head and look up at it, so it hides your chin and makes you look slimmer. It doesn't look natural though. Model Tess Holliday shows how to achieve the same effect while looking natural.