Tagged With science

1

Today every kitchen would seem “under-equipped” without a microwave, with its efficient ability to cook, defrost and reheat a variety of different foods. The handy appliance uses microwave radiation to do so. This is a type of electromagnetic radiation similar to radio waves and infrared light.

Although generally recognised as safe, the internet is awash with articles about the dangers microwave radiation poses to your food. Some claim using microwaves can cause “cataracts and cancer”. Other posts says it “zaps the nutrients right out of your food”.

Shared from Gizmodo

1

Flat Earthers, in addition to believing the world is flat, also believe that every single image of earth taken from space has been photoshopped. And honest to Christ, looking at this new photo of Saturn, I'm starting to wonder myself.

3

Last night, NASA's multi-billion dollar Cassini–Huygens spacecraft crashed into Saturn. It was a spectacular end to a 20-year mission that has provided invaluable information abut the ringed planet and its moons. Here's what you need to know, along with a stream to the live event.

Shared from Gizmodo

0

It shouldn't come as a surprise that sitting for long periods of time is bad for us. But new research suggests it isn't just the total amount of time we spend sitting each day that we need to worry about, it's also the length of time between bouts of physical activity. While still incomplete, these results suggest a sensible life hack that could help certain individuals stave off some of the effects of prolonged sitting.

Shared from Gizmodo

5

There are two time-honoured truths about wine: All of it is good -- even at its worst -- and, when it comes to appreciating wine, nobody knows what the hell they're talking about. The latter truth reveals itself time and again, especially in studies about wine consumption. On that point, a team of scientists at the University of Adelaide proved just how easily we can be fooled into thinking wine is better than it actually is.

0

Jim Cramer, host of CNBC’s Mad Money and co-founder of TheStreet.com, claims to only need four hours of sleep each night to feel well-rested and alert. Cramer said he sleeps between 11:30 p.m. and 3:45 a.m. most weeknights, and rarely needs an alarm to rise. His father, he says, was the same way, only taking a couple of naps but never sleeping a full eight hours.

Cramer’s not the only one: Leaders such as Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, and even ex-US President Barack Obama rarely — if ever — get what’s considered a full night of sleep.

Shared from Gizmodo

0

The solving of a long-standing mystery always sparks ambivalence; a sense of excitement and satisfaction at what it is, coupled with sadness about everything it isn't. As of last week, the cryptic Voynich manuscript, filled with strange glyphs and diagrams, has left the halls of head-scratchers. Yes folks, thanks to historian Nicholas Gibbs, we have a pretty definitive explanation of the purpose of the former literary enigma.

12

Sleep is a mysterious process, and that means it's the subject of many untruths and much ill-informed wishful thinking. If you're trying to improve your quality or quantity of sleep, don't fall for these myths and you'll be well on the way.

2

ExxonMobil’s deliberate attempts to sow doubt on the reality and urgency of climate change and their donations to front groups to disseminate false information about climate change have been public knowledge for a long time, now.

Investigative reports in 2015 revealed that Exxon had its own scientists doing its own climate modeling as far back as the 1970s: science and modeling that was not only accurate, but that was being used to plan for the company’s future. I have a unique perspective – because I was there.

Shared from Gizmodo

0

A national searchable database of both locally available and online science, technology, engineering and mathematics activities is up and running. STARportal is the nation's first dedicated platform connecting students, parents and teachers with STEM events in their local community, as well as online activities.