Tagged With safari

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Apple launched the newest version of its Safari web browser, Safari 12, for macOS Sierra and High Sierra users on September 17, and it brings a bunch of new security features and handy little touches — including favicons.

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Say a webpage isn’t loading right. Maybe it’s collapsed from too much traffic after going viral on Reddit. Maybe it’s blocked in your country thanks to a law like GDPR. Maybe it was recently deleted. Usually Google has a saved copy of that page. And the quickest way to get that saved copy is to type cache: in the address bar.

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Mac: Apple made Safari Technology Preview Release 58 available this week for people running macOS High Sierra and developers running the beta version of macOS Mojave. If you're already running a previous Safari Technology Preview then you can update your version from the Mac App Store's Updates tab. If you aren't, you can download it.

Shared from Gizmodo

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You may have noticed in your travels around the internet that your browser's address bar occasionally turns green and displays a padlock -- that's HTTPS, or a secure version of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol, swinging into action. This little green padlock is becoming vitally important as more and more of your online security is eroded. Just because your ISP can now see what sites you browse on doesn't mean they have to know all the content your consuming.

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Safari has long been the go-to browser on the iPhone, but after Apple finally opened up the secret speed enhancements in Safari to other browsers way back in iOS 8, it's now possible to ditch Safari entirely for another browser. Chrome is the most obvious choice for doing so. But is it worth it?

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When Google originally launched Chrome, it made a point of promoting the browser's performance over its competitors. But that was almost 10 years ago and both Chrome and Apple's desktop OS have changed... a lot. Given this large chunk of time, has Chrome remained on top of the pile when it comes to grunt? The answer is "mostly".

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iOS: Tons of apps have built-in browsers and a number of them use their own code instead of Safari. This lets them track what you're doing and tends to be an underwhelming experience. Browsecurely fixes that so you can open any link with Safari regardless of where you're at.