Tagged With rss reader

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Did you know there are more ways to read RSS content than with Bloglines or Google Reader? MakeUseOf suggest fourteen other ways to maximise sites that have RSS, from utilising previously mentioned FeedJournal to reading RSS content via IM with FeedCrier. Alternatively, for sites that offer RSS feeds but no direct email subscriptions, SendMeRSS is a great way to get that content delivered directly to your inbox. How do you consume or distribute your RSS content outside of the standard feed readers? Share your favorite RSS tools and tricks in the comments. 14 Other Ways to Use RSS Feeds

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There are a number of ways to manage the time you spend web browsing, amongst them trimming the number of blogs you subscribe to. I realised today that one easy way to do this would be to define your 'Must Read' blogs. I'm considering creating a new folder in my RSS reader (Bloglines, still) called "Must Read". Every morning when I open my RSS reader, I skim through the full list of my subscriptions looking out for the handful of blogs I always want to read first. These blogs will go into my "Must Read" folder. The others in my list will need to impress me in order to make the "Must" list - and if I can go a while without checking in on them, they can be deleted.So what's on your "Must Read" list? Mine includes Penelope Trunk's Brazen Careerist. One of the reasons I like it is that it's low volume (usually a post every couple of days, from what I've observed) and I feel like none of it is 'filler' - every post feels worth reading. And while I don't always agree with the points she makes, I often want to reread her posts, or share them, or follow some or all of the links she includes. To me, these are all signs of a blog worth subscribing to. In fact, I've gotten so much out of her blog that I'm picking up a copy of her book today, and I'm really looking forward to reading it.So how do you choose your "Must Read" blogs? Care to share a few of them?

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Google Reader has added a "Discovery" section which recommends new feeds to you based on the RSS subscriptions of people who share similar interests with you. This list is automatically generated and takes into account your location, your existing feed subscriptions as well as your Web History (which I assume means your browsing history). They've also added drag and drop editing of feed subscriptions which means you can move feeds between folders, or change the order of your feeds or folders. But the Google Operating System blog points out that you still can't rename folders or tags.Google Reader Improves Feed Management

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Web-based feed aggregator Google Reader has made two improvements to its interface, one Web 2.0-ish and the other pretty darn useful. The change Reader users will really appreciate is the ability to simply grab newly-added feeds and place them in their folders—no more clicking through menu bars, which really helps when doing multi-feed updates. The other new addition is recommendations, which can be found in the "Discover" link and points you to feeds based on your current list, your search history and your location. As you can see, Reader probably knows you better than you'd think.

Google Reader Improves Feed Management

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If you've got too many feeds and not enough time, productivity site GearFire suggests that you prioritise your feeds by level of urgency; i.e., time-sensitive. Even when you are rushed, there are some feeds whose content may only be applicable to a short time-span. For example, my subscription to Woot! And Giveaway of the Day are both daily deals, and therefore need to be read before other feeds. Recognizing what is urgent and what is not can help you work when you need, without constantly thinking of your feeds. This is a simple task that can save you some reading time; for more information on how to read feeds productively, check out how to get good with Google Reader.

10 Steps to More Productive Feed Reading