Tagged With roasting

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A perfectly roasted, slightly charred Brussels sprout is a very pleasing thing to eat, but one can become fatigued with a single prep method. Good thing there's more than one way to eat these cruciferous delights. Here are a few of our favourites.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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The best vegetable is a roasted vegetable, and the best roasted vegetables are finished with fish sauce. The pungent, salty and sweet sauce is the perfect companion for all sorts of earthy plant parts, from starchy potatoes to cruciferous sprouts.

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Garlic is great in all of its many forms but, like most plant parts, it is at its absolute best when roasted. Roasting garlic mellows its pungency and tempers its aggressive bite, but it also intensifies its sweetness and creates new, deeper flavours through that lovely little Maillard reaction. It's also a freaking cinch to make.

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There are a lot of "correct" ways to cook vegetables but -- though I'm not a huge fan of culinary presciptivism -- I'm going to go ahead and say that roasting is the most correct. Everything from tender green asparagus to hearty root vegetables tastes phenomenal when prepared this way, and it's super easy to execute.

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Marmite is a somewhat polarising spread. (Their slogan is "Love it. Hate it.") Made from brewer's yeast, the salty paste is the British answer to Vegemite. Like Vegemite, it has an umami-packed, almost condensed-soy-sauce-like flavour that can be overwhelming in large amounts. Add just a smidge, though, and you'll boost the savoury-factor of whatever you're eating many times over.

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Basting is a practice so ingrained in the fabric of cooking poultry that most of us do it without question. We assume all that basting will make the bird juicier and more flavourful. However, according to Cook's Illustrated, you could probably just skip it.

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Roasted garlic is somewhat magical, but leaving the oven on for 50 minutes or so isn't always feasible (or desired in these hot-weather months). If you want to mellow out the pungent allium without heating up the house, turn to your skillet.