Tagged With pet hacks

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Some dog breeds have more health problems than others -- we've created so many weird shapes 'n' sizes through controlled breeding that genetic ailments are inevitable. If you have your heart set on a particular type of dog, it's important to be aware of these potential health issues so you can give your pet the best possible care. This infographic looks at common health conditions in 25 popular breeds; from breathing problems in Bulldogs to hip dysplasia in German Shepherds.

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You can befriend a dog by letting it smell you, but you can make a cat love you by offering it your earwax. Is this kind of disgusting? Yes. Does it actually work? Apparently it does.

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Xbox controllers: people love them for gaming, but why not extend that fondness to walking dogs and picking up their crap? That's what Instructables user mikeasaurus decided to do, and he ended up creating one of the most ridiculously awesome ways to repurpose a gaming device.

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Warmer weather means the start of tick season, so pet owners in northern states need to be increasingly vigilant. Examine your dogs and cats daily, but don't fall for the old idea that you can use turps or methylated spirits to remove them.

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Tick season kicks off in spring, and it seems this year our canine friends are under particular threat. The Australian Veterinary Association reports that more than 700 cases of tick paralysis have been reported in Queensland and NSW, so checking your dogs (and cats) for ticks is more important than ever.

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Keeping your pet's water dish full can be a chore (especially if your pet is the large, thirsty kind). Commercial auto-water devices are expensive and don't supply the freshest water. The hacker solution, of course, is to rig your own water-refilling system.

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For some pet cats, trashing pot plants around the house is the only reason to stop sleeping in the nearest sunny patch. If you've given up on keeping houseplants because of a feline terror campaign, you might find this hack, using an IKEA plastic bag storer, a nifty way of creating some plant protection.

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Every dog I've known always makes a beeline straight for the couch. However, if your more compact pooch fancies sitting with the family but can't quite make it up onto the chair, this hack of an IKEA chair into a stool with its own on-ramp and extra wriggle room might be just the ticket.

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If you have pets, you know that summertime is the prime season for fleas. As I discovered yesterday, it's much cheaper and easier to prevent a flea problem in your house than to treat it. For example, a $40 monthly treatment of something like Advantage or Frontline may sound expensive, but once you have fleas in the house you'll need to spend money on flea bombs or carpet spray to get rid of the fleas and eggs in the house, as well as treating your pets to get rid of any fleas they are carryingI've done some research to find out some tips for preventing fleas from moving into your home.Prevention is better than cure!* pre-treat all your pets with a treatment like Frontline or Advantage. You may want to start doing this as early as November to make sure they're protected when flea season starts. These products work by cutting off the breeding cycle of the fleas. If you do this vigilantly you greatly minimise the chance of getting fleas. Set a reminder in your calendar of choice to reapply every month.* sweep wooden floors, vacuum carpets and rugs and your pet's bed regularly. As a rule of thumb - if pet hair collects there, it's a pet bed, whether it's an old towel they like to sleep on, their designated bed, or your couch. clean the outdoor areas where your pet hangs out too - eg doghouse* if you have a garden, plant lots of pyrethrum, pennyroyal or mint, which are deterrants to fleas. A planter near your front and back door, or near the doghouse, sounds like a good plan.Too late?If your pet has already picked up fleas (contact with another animal or from visiting an area with fleas), you'll need to do the following.