Tagged With paleo

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Food is fuel, but that fuel is only effective if one consumes it. While it's all fine and good to suggest you eat a thick piece of cauliflower instead of a steak, that suggestion is devoid of joy, and I happen to think joy is pretty important part of eating (and life). However, there are some healthy swaps out there that aren't as dismal, and I bet you all know some good ones. As always, I have some questions.

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We don't often discuss the mental impact of restrictive diets such as Whole30 (no "inflammatory" foods), keto (low carb, high fat) or paleo (foods supposedly eaten during the Palaeolithic era). People like to tout the weight loss and mood-boosting effects of these diets, but experts say they can push some of us toward disordered eating.

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The guiding principle of 'paleo' is to only eat foods that were consumed by our Paleolithic ancestors. There's only one problem: almost everything we think we know about prehistoric humans' diets is based on conjecture. (There were no caveman cookbooks or reality TV shows, sadly.) In other words, paleo "experts" like Pete Evans are guessing about the past.

As it turns out, a lot of this guesswork has been flat-out wrong. A new analysis of Neanderthal teeth uncovered in Spain and Belgium has discovered a lot more variation in Paleolithic diets than we previously thought. Here's the evidence.

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Cauliflower is a really awesome vegetable that can be used to replace carbier fare in recipes. If you can't or don't eat bread, but still want a flavorful, homey side for your turkey, consider making this cauliflower "stuffing" from delish. (Technically I think this would be a "dressing," but I'll let it slide.)

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We still hear and read a lot about how a diet based on what our Stone Age ancestors ate may be a cure-all for modern ills. But can we really run the clock backwards and find the optimal way to eat? It's a largely impossible dream based on a set of fallacies about our ancestors.