Tagged With Money

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If you're a dummy when it comes to savings, join my club. From the moment I got my first paycheck at 15, I was liberated with this newly-found financial freedom. I bought a surfboard I still to this day have never used and I raided Target's Disney DVD range to add to my own dusty collection. My first few paychecks never did last very long.

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In 2009, I was 27 years old and a year into my first full-time job with benefits. I was working as an executive assistant at a think tank in Washington, DC, and had ended up in this job after spending the past five years telemarketing, temping, going to grad school to get a MFA in theatre, coming out of grad school no longer wanting to work in the theatre, and asking a professor whom I trusted how I could get a job that paid at least $US50,000 ($72,275) a year.

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Maybe you’ve already started to reflect on where 2019 has taken you, and what you want to focus on in 2020. You’re planning a trip, or figuring out how to get back to the gym regularly, or thinking of starting a hobby. But have you thought about your money?

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As much as we love a night in on the couch watching whatever is next in our Netflix queue, there’s something great about putting on outside pants and being part of a live audience. Whether it’s a concert, movie or sporting event, sometimes it’s worth the hassle to experience something surrounded by other fans. But if you want to do these things, you’re going to need to buy tickets, and those can get expensive. Fortunately, there are a few ways to save money on tickets of all types.

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If you want to achieve your financial goals, you’re going to need to have some cash set aside for unexpected expenses.

If you want to achieve your time-based goals, whether that’s “completing my work by 5pm” or “writing a 50,000-word novel in November,” you’ll need to set aside time for both your work and the unexpected stuff that gets in the way of your work.

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When I asked recently about bad money habits you learned from your parents, you chimed in with stories of debt, despair and the bumpy roads you’ve taken to financial stability. But just because you (eventually) learned not to make the same mistakes your parents made doesn’t mean that your entire family tree is cured of its financial flaws.

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Consolidating your superannuation isn't just about convenience - it can result in thousands of dollars in extra savings. According to a recent study from the Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia (ASFA), the average person needs $42,953 a year to live comfortably in retirement. In other words, every dollar counts! Thankfully, it's now much easier to roll multiple super accounts into one place. Here's what you need to consider.

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Over the weekend, devastating fires in Northern California forced an estimated 200,000 people to evacuate—the single largest evacuation in Sonoma County in its history, the Washington Post writes. Meanwhile, just a few hundred kilometres south, the Getty Fire has already engulfed at least 200 hectares in the Los Angeles area and forced thousands of others to evacuate.

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The next time you receive a gift card, don’t save it for a special occasion — and don’t toss it in a drawer and forget about it. Use your card as soon as possible, because otherwise you’re providing the company with an interest-free loan.

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U.S. banking company Capital One has started the notification process for its most recent data breach — affecting approximately 100 million people in the U.S. and an additional six million in Canada (for now). While you might feel protected in Australia, data breaches happen surprisingly often, and they're can impact anyone. That's why it's important to read the fine print.

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One of the best things about employment in Australia is superannuation. Under current laws, employers must pay 9.5% of your salary into an approved fund that is set aside for your retirement.

But with the age at which you can get the pension rising from 65 to 67 over the next few years, many people having larger mortgages than ever before, and life expectancy increasing, the amount of money needed to live comfortably after leaving the full-time workforce is a challenging question. So how much money do you actually need at retirement?