Tagged With mobile networks

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One of my favourite terms, penned by Scott Adams - the creator of the Dilbert comic strip, is confusopoly. It's basically a market that is designed to obfuscate information from consumers so they can't easily compare services between providers in a market. The mobile phone market is notorious for this.

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Mobile networks are no longer just aimed at people chasing fast download speeds. Instead autonomous drones, self-driving cars and other smart devices will benefit most from Australia's new super-fast 5G networks launching next year.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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Vodafone has announced a massive overhaul to postpaid plans, with sweeping changes to lock-in contracts, handset repayments and separate charges for voice, text and data usage so customers know exactly what they're spending.

According to Vodafone, the new plans will give customers better choice and flexibility: but how do they stack up in reality? We take a look at what's different.

Shared from Gizmodo

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These days, Optus seems to spend most of its money on content deals -- but it's also investing in network infrastructure for the people that need it the most. Optus will build 500 new mobile sites out across rural regional parts of Australia, will upgrade 1800 sites from 3G to 4G, and will boost existing sites with better 4G and small cell satellite coverage at a cost of $1 billion -- the largest regional investment in its 25 year history as a company.

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With TPG set to launch a fourth mobile network, the rise of new WiFi based services and 5G set to become a reality, it's fair to say Australia's telcos are preparing for significant changes as we enter a new decade. Based on informed forecasts, here’s what Australia’s cellular network scene could look like by 2020.

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When Tropical Cyclone Debbie hit Queensland last week, one of the casualties was the region’s mobile phone network. Phone towers can stop working because they have been damaged by the wind, or because they have run out of diesel to run their generators.

Whatever the cause, the end result is the same: a number of people will find their mobile phones not connected to the network, leaving them without communications for an extended period of time. Here's how to stay connected in times of need.

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It's no exaggeration to say that Telstra's customer service has been pretty abysmal over the past year. On numerous occasions it failed to deliver the bare minimum -- namely, a working network for its customers. Needless to say, there have been significant repercussions for the telco and the higher ups are now feeling the pinch. Telstra’s senior staff have reportedly lost millions in bonuses and incentive payments linked to customer service performance. Sounds like a fair cop to us.

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Optus has become the last of Australia's major telcos to introduce VoLTE -- Voice over LTE -- which allows customers to make and receive calls over the high-speed 4G Plus network. This saves phones from constantly having to switch between 3G and 4G while making calls, while also lending itself to clearer, more consistent calls.

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Everybody loves speedy internet, so it’s no surprise that every major telecom provider in the world is working to make it even faster. Smartphones, watches, homes and cars are increasingly requiring stable internet connections. In order to pipe in enough bandwidth for that precious wireless feed, we're going to need an entirely new form of wireless signal -- that’s where 5G comes in.

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The number of complaints sent to the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman (TIO) are at their lowest level in nine years. On the whole, customers are more satisfied with the telco services they pay for, particularly when it comes to mobile coverage. However, complaints relating to internet services are on the rise with NBN causing more ire than ever.

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Telstra's national wi-fi network will be officially "switched on" this Tuesday. Now dubbed 'Air', the network uses hotspots in shopping centres, cafes, sporting stadiums, train stations and old payphones to deliver the largest Wi-Fi network in the country. Unfortunately, it will only be offered free to Telstra's home broadband customers, with mobile customers charged an access fee of up to $23.

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From 1 January 2015, the 694—820 megahertz (MHz) frequency range will be used exclusively by telecommunications companies to provide 4G mobile broadband services. This means it will be illegal to use wireless microphones and other audio devices that operate in the same frequency range. Thankfully, ACMA is on the case...

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Everyone you know has a smartphone and mobile data network usage is growing hugely, but what do those developments mean for IT pros when it comes to managing and deploying apps and equipment? Here are some key trends to watch out for (including average download speeds for Aussies and how many of us really use 4G) and what they'll mean for your future projects.

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When you're choosing a mobile phone network, you'll quickly face the choice between a "regular" telephone network and a mobile virtual network operator (MVNO). What's the difference and does it matter?