Tagged With mind your language

0

It seems like everyone has different head canon for the word "dude". Did it come from England? Was it about drifters in the Wild West? Thanks to a 2013 study, we have a better idea.

7

Last week, a 32-year-old man in the US was nearly electrocuted after falling asleep with his iPhone charging in bed. The key word here is "nearly" - a point of difference many journalists failed to make.

As any English teacher or medical student will tell you, electrocution is not the same thing as an electric shock. While the latter can cause serious injury, only the former results in instantaneous death.

5

Contrary to popular belief, commas don’t just signify pauses in a sentence. In fact, precise rules govern when to use this punctuation mark.

When followed, they lay the groundwork for clear written communication. We’ve compiled a list of all of the times when you need the mighty comma.

0

Do you go to the store for "cupcakes, vanilla, and chocolate" or "cupcakes, vanilla and chocolate"? There's a long-running debate over whether it's proper to include that last comma in a list. Lifehacker's policy is to eschew it, but we have to admit that the so-called 'Oxford comma' does makes things clearer on occasion - as proven in a recent US lawsuit.

3

Whether you like it or not, swearing has gradually been normalised and dropping an F-bomb in mixed company would barely raise an eyebrow these days. But have you thought about whether swearing in public is legal in Australia? If so, read on.

0

Love it or hate it, the Comic Sans typeface makes amateur typographers of us all. People don’t normally talk about the fonts they use. Most of us only notice typefaces when they are atypical or inhibit our ability to read. Comic Sans is different. It divides opinion among those who don’t usually identify as typeface enthusiasts.

2

Do you remember being taught you should never start your sentences with “And” or “But”?

What if I told you that your teachers were wrong and there are lots of other so-called grammar rules that we’ve probably been getting wrong in our English classrooms for years?

28

An Australian judge has dismissed charges of offensive language against three marriage equality protesters who were caught on camera chanting swear words. Apparently, yelling expletives into a loudspeaker on public property no longer constitutes offensive language. Good to know.

Shared from Gizmodo

4

Have you ever wondered why Americans and British/Aussies spell English differently? How are colour and colour the same word? Centre and center? What's up with that? It's all thanks to Noah Webster (yeah, the Webster of Merriam-Webster). When America gained independence, Webster wanted to simplify unreasonable spellings that were handed down from the British.

4

At yesterday's US presidential debate, Donald Trump said this: "I have a tremendous income. And the reason I say that is not in a braggadocious way". It left a lot of people scratching their heads as to whether he made the word up. We did some research to find the answer.

13

The acronym "LGBT" was once considered sufficiently representational of non-heterosexual sexuality and gender types. Well, it looks like we're going to need a few more letters. A new Australian sex survey conducted by researchers at The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) has listed a whopping 33 options under the question "Which of the following terms do you feel best describes your gender?". Here's the full list, along with definitions of what they represent.

5

We all make grammar mistakes from time to time. Usually it's because you're in a rush, writing informally or simply not devoting your full attention to the task at hand. While the odd grammatical snafu is forgivable, there are some errors you definitely need to avoid. This infographic looks at 15 bone-headed stuff-ups that will cause anyone reading to seriously question your intelligence.

6

Our English teachers told us to avoid the word "very" because it's weak and vague. They were right, and many times, we use "very" as a modifier for a word that could easily be replaced with a stronger, more accurate word. This infographic tells you what to use instead.

23

"The United States and Great Britain are two countries separated by a common language." So goes the old chestnut commonly attributed to playwright George Bernard Shaw. One of those separations is in the spelling of words like colour (color), theatre (theater), and realise (realize). But how did this separation occur?