Tagged With mind hacks

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I come from a quiet people. My classmates and I were always bad at asking questions of the teacher, or recognising that we had questions. I wish I’d had someone like historian and professor Jacqueline Antonovich, who recently tweeted a trick for encouraging her students to pipe up. She simply rephrases the prompt “Any questions?” to “What questions do you have for me?”

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Your career is probably going to peak 10-20 years before you retire. After that, you’re likely to reach the unhappiest point in your adult life. If you aren’t ready for it, the late-career decline can unsettle you and make it much harder to transition into retirement, or even retire at the age you planned to.

To deal with this shift, you need to change your priorities toward those that are better achieved later in life.

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It may seem like some people are born likable, but everyone is capable of developing charisma. No matter what your personality, there are certain traits you can practise and apply to your own behaviour that can make you seem more magnetic, trustworthy and influential. Here are the basics to developing charisma.

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Is mind-reading actually possible? How can we interpret body language to better understand what others are really thinking? In this week’s episode, Alice and Melissa are exploring these questions and more with the help of Swedish mentalist Henrik Fexeus (aka “Sweden’s Derren Brown”). Henrik is the author of the international bestseller, The Art of Reading Minds: How to Understand and Influence Others Without Them Noticing, and in this episode he explains what mind-reading really is, and how we can use it to our advantage.

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“I can’t fucking stand people who don’t know the difference between a ‘reason’ and an ‘excuse,’” says redditor raspberrykoolaid, talking about those repugnant people who can’t sympathise with any problem they haven’t faced themselves, and think that everyone else is just offering excuses. You don’t want to be one of those people. But you also don’t want to be a sniveling disappointment. Your whole life will improve when you can tell a reason from an excuse.

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In the most recent episode of Bojack Horseman, Hollyhock (Aparna Nancherla) has a panic attack at a party. A guy named Peter talks her through it. “Look around the room and tell me what you see,” he says. Hollyhock names things—first the things giving her anxiety, then more and more mundane stuff in the room. “It’s a trick my psychiatrist taught me,” Peter says. “It’s supposed to help you ground yourself.”

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Every year, Lifehacker celebrates the dark side of life-hacking with Evil Week. From today, we'll be highlighting all the things you shouldn't do - assuming you're a good person. Let the trolling begin!

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The internet is full of crap. For every piece of reputable information you'll find countless rumours, misinformation and downright falsehoods. Separating truth from fiction is equal parts a mental battle and diligent research. Here's how to make sure you never get duped.

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Practising yoga offers many benefits to your health and general wellbeing - but who has time to join a class? Between work, family and social engagements, there's simply no room for stretchy exercises down the park. Fortunately, it's possible to pack the mental benefits of yoga into just 10 minutes - without leaving your home or office. Read on for step-by-step instructions.

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Even the busiest worker suffers from poor motivation every once in a while. Maybe it's been too long since your last holiday or maybe that work project you poured your heart and soul into failed miserably. Whatever the reason, you need to buck up before it starts affecting your professional reputation. This infographic explains 10 tried-and-tested methods that will help you to stay motivated.

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It’s not just that we have a lot to think about and manage in our personal lives each day. We’re also inundated with Big Topics like government turmoil and climate change and inequality on a nearly daily basis. Add in the fact that we’re always trying to multitask in the middle of it — cook dinner, respond to that work email and yell at the kids to stop arguing — it’s too much.

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Cognitive bias occurs when we make subjective assumptions about people or situations based on our own perception of reality. This can lead to irrational decisions and judgement calls that affect those around us. They can alter the way you see everything without you even realising it.

Identifying the problem is the first step towards rational thinking. Here are 24 distinct biases that you need to be aware of - from "declinism" (believing the past was better than the present) to "fundamental attribution error" (judging others on their character but yourself on the situation).

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Any time you’re making long-term plans based on more than your own behaviour, you need to remember just how unpredictable the world is. It can be hard not to get carried away, especially if you have lots of “good” data to base your plans on. The Collaborative Fund blog lists 12 things to keep in mind when making plans and predictions. While the blog focuses mostly on investment predictions, these are good principles to remember in any kind of planning. Our favourites.

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I once showed up to a party alone, before any of my friends arrived. Instead of mingling, I hid in the bathroom to kill time and avoid talking to strangers. Embarrassing but true. For a shy person, social interaction can be a stomach-churning, anxiety-filled experience. It was for me, but I was able to get it under control with some work and become comfortable talking to strangers.

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A lot of us know that saying “phone, wallet, keys” before we walk out the door can remind us of what we don’t want to leave behind. Well, it turns out that developing similar mantras for other areas of our lives can help us focus on our goals.