Tagged With mesh networking

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Mesh networking is the "in" thing at the moment. As we depend on Wi-Fi to connect more devices than ever, those blackspots around the house or office become more acutely annoying. D-Link has been a long-time player in the networking business so it's no surprise they've made an entry to the mesh business. They have several options to choose from. I've been running the COVR-C1203. Here's what I've found.

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Mesh networking has become increasingly popular as people try to improve wireless coverage at their homes and offices. But it's been challenging to deploy as you've needed to choose a brand a stick to it as gear from different vendors didn't work together. But that's set to change as the WiFi Alliance establishes a new, software-based standard that will enable cross-manufacturer interoperability.

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Over recent weeks, I've been testing three different mesh network kits, the Linksys Velop, TP-Link Deco and Netgear Orbi. All three are competent but have different strengths and weaknesses. And while they all, more or less do the same thing - deliver wireless network access over a large are - they do differ in some ways. Here's where I'd spend my money.

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Netgear has long been a significant player in the networking business. The Orbi is their play in the competitive world of mesh networking, that uses multiple wireless devices that interoperate to cover a large area with a single WLAN.Netgear sent me me three different Orbi systems to try out. I've reviewed their premium system, the AC3000 system, which is designed to cover up to 350 square metres of area.

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TP-link has build a reputation for making great networking kit that doesn't cost an arm and leg. The Deco is their push into the world of mesh networks. Their three node kit is much like the Linksys Velop I looked at earlier this week in that it is set up using an app but it does differ when you get into the details.