Tagged With linux.conf.au

0

Here's a weird thing about Linux.conf.au: roughly one in five attendees is also a speaker. That means the speakers dinner (which also incorporates volunteers) is a bigger event than you might anticipate. This time around, we pretty much filled the function centre at Sovereign Hill, where we drank a lot of beer, ate a lot of food and soaked up a little colonial history.

1

Attending Linux.conf.au is a great way to enhance my knowledge and scare me into presenting, but it's an exhausting five days. It's mentally exhausting because of all the new information to be acquired, and it's physically exhausting because it's the height of summer in Ballarat and the temperature is 32 degrees or more.

12

Free public Wi-Fi is still a relative rarity in Australia's major cities, so how is it possible to make it viable in a town with less than 400 people? Newstead offers some interesting lessons about Wi-Fi, the National Broadband Network (NBN), open source and how to manage community projects.

4

I'm no stranger to the annual open source shenanigans of Linux.conf.au. Indeed, the 2012 event in Ballarat marks the seventh time I've attended this conference, but it feels strange this year for two particular reasons. It's the first time I've ever chosen to use the on-campus accommodation and I'm actually doing a presentation this year, which means that I'm both reverting to a student lifestyle and panicking like crazy.

0

The original closing date for paper submissions for Linux.conf.au 2012 was last Friday, and no doubt many people (including the editor of this very site) rushed to meet the deadline. However, there's now been an extension until August 7, so if you've got a brilliant vision for an open source-themed presentation and fancy a trip to Ballarat in January next year, you've got another week to get your submission in for judging. (Lifehacker will be attending whether I'm presenting or not.)

1

"Father of the Internet" Vint Cerf reckonsreckons that cloud computing is great, but that it needs standards for systems to communicate. Sendmail pioneer Eric Allman argues that too many people fail to realise that cloud computing involves a return to computing approaches from decades ago.