Tagged With linux

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The Lifehacker staff sifts through a ton of apps on a regular basis, but a few have stuck with us over the years. Some apps are simply nice to have, while others have become essential in our daily lives. From dealing with irate dragons to counting our mindfulness minutes, each app on this list has a special place in our hearts (and our homescreens). Best of all, they're all free.

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Your web browser knows a lot about you, and tells the sites you visit a lot about you as well — if you let it. We’ve talked about which browsers are best at ad-blocking, but in this guide, we’re going to focus on the browsers that you’ll want to use to better conceal everything you’re up to from all the advertisers that want to track your digital life.

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Google announced that the latest update for the Chrome browser, Chrome 73, has begun rolling out to Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms. While these updates normally cover security fixes, system-level changes, and new tools for developers, Chrome 73 also includes a handful of new features for general users as well — including the much-requested Dark Mode — although their availability will be different depending on the platform you’re using.

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Maybe you’ve grown tired of your current laptop or desktop operating system and you just want to try something different. Or maybe you need to use multiple OSes for work. Either way, the need for a new operating system doesn’t mean you need a whole new computer. There are numerous ways to run other operating systems without going out and buying a new machine. We’ve gathered your options, with the pros and cons for each, below.

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As the New York Times reported yesterday, IBM is in the process of purchasing Red Hat, one of the largest corporate contributors to the Linux kernel. The news is great if you’ve got stock in either company or a passion to see a cloud computing services challenge Amazon (and Microsoft). But if you’re a fan of open source software, IBM’s move might be a little worrisome.

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Linux users are likely familiar with Wine — a piece of software that allows Windows software to be run on Linux. But did you know you can download and run Linux on Windows natively, and through the Microsoft Store of all places? Yes, I'm serious. It's all thanks to the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL), a feature that was first added to Windows 10 in 2016 as a beta feature for those in the Windows Insider program, and has since been released to the public.

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There are plenty of reasons to run a virtual machine. The first, and most compelling, is that you want to play: Maybe there are some other operating system you want to dabble with (cough Linux cough), but you don’t want to deal with installing another hard drive, partitioning your existing drive, or setting up your system a different way.

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Dell's spiffy Developer Edition notebooks are a product of the company's "Project Sputnik", an "open-ended exploratory project to identify what developers wanted in an ideal system". Unfortunately, despite being widely available in the US and Europe, you can't get them in Australia (the exception being the Precision 5520). So, why do we miss out?

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So you've made the switch to Linux. Or you're thinking of making the switch. But you have questions that might be stopping you from fully diving in. One of the biggest concerns most new users have is, "What software is available and how do I install it?"

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Of all the desktops available for the Linux operating system, GNOME has managed to become on of the most efficient, stable and reliable -- while still remaining incredibly user-friendly. In fact, most users -- regardless of experience -- can get up to speed with GNOME with next to no effort.

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There are currently over two million apps available for Apple iPhone. Android has even more. When you throw in Windows, Mac, Linux and myriad browser extensions, the number of apps to choose from is truly overwhelming.

To help simplify things, Lifehacker's experts have hand-picked around 200 apps for Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, Chrome and iOS that every technology user should own. Best of all, most of them are completely free!

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Where does all the time go? When it comes to the time you spend on your phone, your computer, and the web, this doesn't have to be a vague and rhetorical question - plenty of tools out there will track and monitor your time automatically, telling you exactly which apps and sites are sucking up most of your precious minutes of existence.

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The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux.