Tagged With lifehacker book contest winner

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Here's our final winner in the reader contest to win an autographed copy of our new book, Upgrade Your Life. Thanks to everyone who submitted! Reader Martin is determined to not let the exercise bike next to his computer desk just sit there and gather dust. Instead, he wants to cycle while he surfs, and decided to start building his "Nerdcycle" by mounting an extra monitor to the stationary bike. Martin writes in:

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Readers are submitting their best life hack for a chance to win an autographed copy of our new book, Upgrade Your Life. Here's our latest winner. Reader Jill carries her life on a thumb drive and if she loses it, she wants to make it as easy on the person who finds it as possible to return the drive. Jill writes in:

I've been messing around with a way to mark my thumb drive so it will (maybe) be returned if I lose it. Chances are, I won't actually "lose" it; I will leave it at the house of a friend or at work. But I want to get it back—ASAP—without having to call all over the universe to find it. Of course, the drive is encrypted so i don't need to worry about data falling into the wrong hands. I only worry about having to rebuild EVERYTHING because I carry my life on my thumb drive.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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Readers are submitting their best life hack for a chance to win an autographed copy of our new book, Upgrade Your Life. Here's our latest winner. Reader Matt grabs songs from YouTube videos the way we used to hit the cassette deck record button while listening to the radio back in the 80's. Well, not really. Matt does it by downloading the YouTube clip .FLV file and converting it to MP3. After the jump, get the steps and tools you need to do it yourself.

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Readers are submitting their best life hack for a chance to win an autographed copy of our new book, Upgrade Your Life. Here's our latest winner. When reader Jim steps away from his PC at the office, he likes to let everyone know where he is—and he uses his screensaver to do just that. But digging through the settings every time he has to change the status message is tedious, so Jim streamlines the process with a handy script that he invokes with a simple key combination. After the jump, download Jim's fabulous script and learn how to set it up for yourself.

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Readers are submitting their best life hack for a chance to win an autographed copy of our new book, Upgrade Your Life. Here's our latest winner. Reader Jeadly got sick of hitting the Caps Lock key without meaning to, and uses a custom utility to stop the madness without disabling it completely. Jeadly writes:

I've written an AutoHotkey script that handicaps the Caps Lock key. I suppose I should call it "Handicapslock." With my script running, the Caps Lock key doesn't lock "on" unless you double tap it, so its behaviour is more like the Shift key.

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Throughout this week, readers are submitting their best life hack for a chance to win an autographed copy of our new book, Upgrade Your Life. Last Wednesday Adam showed you how to download music from shared iTunes libraries over the internet using third-party app Mojo, but PC users were disappointed to find the Windows Mojo beta only works on local networks. But reader Dexter put two and two together, and shares his Windows iTunes library over the internet with Mojo and the free VPN client, Hamachi.

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For the next two weeks, readers are submitting their best life hack for a chance to win an autographed copy of our new book, Upgrade Your Life. If you own a domain name with an active catch-all email address, you know how spammers can pummel you with junk mail to every [email protected] email address they can automatically generate. When you have your own domain, you can to use site-specific addresses when you register for web services to track down spam sources (like [email protected]), but once you do that, you've got to keep your catch-all address open to junk mail as well. But Google Apps user Ray has a clever system that filters out catch-all junk but still lets him track exactly who's selling out his address. Here's how to set it up.