Tagged With labels

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There comes a time when enough is, quite simply, enough. I had been putting off the task of organising my sprawling Gmail inbox for months, if not years. But when Lifehacker told me that we were going to have a Spring Cleaning week, I knew it was time. And I wasn't going to waste precious hours trying to find apps or tools to do the task for me. I needed to Ron Swanson my inbox -- roll up my sleeves, jump in, and manage the mess manually.

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I recently purchased a few smart bulbs and have plans to expand my collection of smart lights. I did notice a small inconvenience during setup, however: It was hard to tell which bulb was which without staring into an app. So I added a visual aid to my bulbs using emoji stickers. It's a lot easier to see the "banana" light is out instead of trying to figure out which bulb is "Hue living room bulb 7" while your ceiling fan is off.

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A good label maker can be portable and hand-held, attached to your computer via USB, or somewhere in between. It needs to print good labels that are readable and that will last, whether they're in a filing cabinet, your pantry, or your freezer. This week we're looking at five of the best.

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Google added two new features to Gmail Labs today: The often-requested Nested Labels - for those of you who like folder-style label nesting - and "Message Sneak Peek", which provides a quick look at an email when you right-click the message in your inbox.

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Google's data-crunching ways found that the majority of Gmail users aren't actually using the webmail service's labels. Starting today, those label names get higher placement, and drag-and-drop labelling aims to make Gmail's labels more like familiar email folders.

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Firefox only: Gmail's powerful filters and labels make it great for organizing, but when you have multiple labels assigned to a message the subject barely fits on the screen—unless you auto-hide them with a script.

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AutofillPDF Labels is a handy web tool for anyone who's wanted to print their own labels of any kind, but loathes the idea of manually filling out the printing template over and over. Many print-your-own label packets come with links or CDs that get you a pre-formatted Word document to fill out. Unless you're getting married or sending out other invitations, though, you'll usually end up putting the same thing on each label, and Ctrl-C/V-ing your precious time away. This handy webapp pops open a scripted PDF file on any system, while letting you change the font, styling, size, and other text properties, and also add images. In short, you create one label, and the PDF fills out the rest of them for you. The templates include CD labels, address or mailing, file folder labels, and even non-sticky business cards. Free to use, no sign-up required, and it works best with Adobe Acrobat (the free reader). autofillPDF Labels