Tagged With keyboard

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Nothing kills typos faster than predictive text. Just think of how often you go about your day, texting away, using your smartphone's built-in capabilities to predict the big words you're trying to type before you finish them. If you're good, you can compose a decent thought without ever hitting an actual letter. So, why can't you do this on your PC, too?

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Laptops are uncomfortable. But you can fix that if you're willing to look just a little weird. The key is in the just a little. Today Wall Street Journal tech columnist Christopher Mims tweeted a photo of his mobile work station. Mims uses a wireless mouse, foldable keyboard and laptop stand to make an ergonomic but efficient setup when he's working at a cafe.

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Windows/Mac: I casually mentioned the existence of Emojicopy the other day in one of our secret Lifehacker chat rooms, and I was surprised to find that nobody else had ever heard of this site. Which then got me thinking: How do most people hunt down emoji to drop into messages, blog posts and other important documents?

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The way we interact with the internet has advanced rapidly in the past decade. For some, plucking out a smartphone and asking a virtual assistant for advice has become the norm, but that doesn’t mean we’re going to consign the humble keyboard to the depths of history any time soon.

Microsoft’s Modern Keyboard shows how far you can take a simple desktop keyboard, if you’re willing to pay for it.

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I love a good mechanical keyboard. There's something so satisfying about hearing the light tapping noises when I punch down on the keys. While mechanical keyboards are highly prized by gamers and coders, they can also be appealing to those that work on PCs on a regular basis. I often work from home so having a keyboard that is suitable for gaming and work would be the Holy Grail for me. Does the Ozone Strike Pro fit the bill? Let's find out.

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If you have to Google/copy/paste every time you want to type a word with an accented character, we have good news for you: There's an easier way. Read on for the fastest way to type these letters on Mac, Windows and Linux.

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Tablets and smartphones are now standard productivity tools in the workplace and while they can do a whole host of things that a laptop can, they fall short when it comes to one function – typing. While some have mastered the art of touchscreen typing, it’s never going to be as good as tapping your fingers on a tangible keyboard. Good thing there are portable, wireless keyboards available on the market. We give the Microsoft Universal Foldable Keyboard a test drive.

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iOS (Jailbroken): As Addictive Tips points out, the visible-only-when-necessary keyboard on iOS devices comes with a dismiss button on the iPad, but not on the iPhone. This behaviour is fine most of the time, but I'm sure you've run into certain lousily-coded apps that cover up important information with the keyboard even when you're done typing. Pull to Dismiss solves this problem.

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One of the biggest pet peeves for users who switch to Mac from Windows is the Delete key, because it feels backwards. To make matters worse, the vast majority of Mac users don't use the full-size keyboard (which has Delete keys for both directions). Here are a few quick shortcuts to set the matter straight for everyone, but especially for those MacBook users out there.

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Windows only: If you need to lock input to your computer temporarily, skip applications that require to you key in fancy combinations to unlock things. BlockInput unlocks itself. The options for BlockInput are simple. You select which hotkey you want to use to activate the program and how many seconds you want to the application to lock the input from your mouse and keyboard. The default is CTRL+Q and 5 seconds, presumably so the first time you test the program you don't find yourself staring at the computer for the next half hour waiting for it to unlock. Whether you need a window of time to wipe down your mouse and keyboard with some sanitising wipes or you have a particularly sensitive application you want to make sure isn't disturbed, BlockInput is a dead simple solution. BlockInput is freeware, Windows only. BlockInput

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Windows only: Your system's got a fancy keyboard with a host of handy media shortcut buttons, but they only work with a select few apps. Media Keyboard 2 Media Player fills in the support gap. Once installed, MK2MP acts as a middle man between your keyboard and popular media-applications like VLC, Xion, XMPlay, 1BY1, and Winamp. The application runs almost invisible to the end user, passing the keyboard command onto the application with the right trigger. You can enable and disable common media-keyboard keys for each program, and specify whether it sits in your system tray or stays incognito. If the program you need to control isn't yet available, the application is in active development and open to suggestions for new players to be added. Looking for a new media player in general? Check out the Hive Five results for best desktop media players. Media Keyboard 2 Media Player

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Sticking with trusted computers is your best bet for security, but sometimes security-unknown setups are unavoidable. Enter text with a Greasemonkey-powered virtual keyboard, though, and key-loggers are out of luck. Using a virtual keyboard isn't an absolute guarantee against having your login and password lifted—thieves can be rather resourceful, of course—but it is a good defence against hardware and basic software key-loggers. More than 22 keyboard layouts are available, making it easy to take advantage of that great Slovenian password you've been dying to use. Virtual Keyboard Interface is a Greasemonkey script, works wherever Greasemonkey does. Virtual Keyboard Interface