Tagged With itunes store

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The good news: CNET has sources saying the three largest music labels will allow Apple to offer music downloads free of copy-protection. And the bad news might not be that bad. In exchange for the DRM-free tracks, Apple will reportedly allow labels to push three tiers of pricing. Older songs from the archives will likely get cheaper than 99 cents, songs that are newer and "midline" (i.e. not big hits) will inhabit the familiar 99 cent mark, and newer, bigger hits will fetch higher, unnamed dollar amounts.< If announced at the Macworld conference today—which our gadget-obsessed cousins at Gizmodo are, of course, covering live —there could also be over-the-air 3G downloads coming to iPhone owners, and DRM dropped from everything in the iTunes store on launch. As Greg Sandoval at CNET points out, though, that leaves a question mark on tracks already purchased through iTunes. Will variable, DRM-free pricing make you a (new or returning) iTunes customer? Tell us your take in the comments.

Sources: Apple to expand DRM-free music, new pricing

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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A number of blogs and web zines lately have examined Apple's App Store and its development policies and voiced their complaints. Chief among them are the app approvers' inconsistent approval standards—ranking the "Pull My Finger" app as not useful, for example, but allowing virtual bubble-wrap poppers—and taking a hard stance against any app that tries to upgrade or replace the built-in tools on an iPhone or iPod touch, like native podcast downloading or feature-added email clients. App Store developers knew Apple's policies from the start, of course, but many are calling for the Cupertino cool-maker to drop the secrecy and allow in competing apps. We're wondering what our iPhone/iPod touch app fans think—are you glad Apple's trying to keep an eye on the store, so to speak, or do you feel like you're missing out on potentially killer apps? Tell us your take on the store and its ground rules in the comments.

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More than 550 new applications arrived for the iPhone and iPod touch this morning in iTunes' brand new App Store and more than 130 of them are available for free. Today we're taking a look at the best free applications for your iPhone and iPod Touch, available after the 2.0 software update officially arrives (or after you've grabbed the unofficial update). Check out our list after the jump.