Tagged With intel

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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After more than three decades as the leader in desktop and laptop processors, Intel's reputation is in big trouble. Following on the heels of the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, F-Secure has revealed a new flaw that allows a hacker to bypass the need to enter credentials, including BIOS and Bitlocker passwords and TPM (Trusted Platform Module) PINs.

It affects most, if not all laptops that support Intel Management Engine/Intel AMT. Here's what you need to know.

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The biggest tech news of the summer has, arguably, been the revelation that CPUs in a massive number of computer systems are susceptible to three different vulnerabilities. Two of these, CVE 2017-5753 and CVE 2017-5715, have been dubbed Spectre with the third, CVE 2017-5754, given the Meltdown moniker. Tech companies around the world have been scrambling to provide mitigations to these vulnerabilities. Microsoft has provided some detail on what they've done and what performance impact you can expect.

Shared from Gizmodo

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Intel and AMD might be fierce competitors for decades, but that hasn't stopped the two chip makers from teaming up to create a new mobile CPU with souped up integrated GPU that will soon be found in gaming and professional laptops from many major computer makers. We've known about this plan since November, but now we have the details.

Shared from Gizmodo

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This week, news of massive security vulnerabilities afflicting every modern model of Intel processor went public, even as developers for practically every major platform frantically rushed to roll out fixes. Much more information has now become available about Meltdown and Spectre, a group of attack methods malicious parties could use to break into some of the most sensitive inner workings of any device using the affected CPUs.

Shared from Gizmodo

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There's small screwups and big screwups. Here is tremendously huge screwup: Virtually all Intel processors produced in the last decade have a major security hole that could allow "normal user programs - from database applications to JavaScript in web browsers - to discern to some extent the layout or contents of protected kernel memory areas," the Register reports.

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When I first started using PCs regularly, back in the early 1990s, systems using Intel processors were priced at a premium. So that meant my first couple of Windows PCs (we had a Commodore 128 at home before that) ran a Cyrix processor - a 486DLC if memory serves. But through most of the 1990s Intel ruled the roost. Their "Intel Inside" campaign was one of the most successful marketing campaigns of all time. But the world has moved on and we are on the cusp of a new processor era.

Shared from Kotaku

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It's been a whirlwind year in the PC market, in no small part thanks to the return of AMD. But things just got a whole lot more insane of late, with AMD and Intel - of all companies - announcing a partnership.

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For as long as I can remember, PC makers have been looking for a single cable/connector combination that can be used for video, peripherals, power and other I/O functions. Thunderbolt 3 with USB-C connectors brings us close to realising that dream. And to help with that Intel is planning to do two things: integrate Thunderbolt 3 into CPUs and releasing the Thunderbolt Protocol Specification to industry.

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AMT, or Active Management Technology, is an Intel technology, that combines hardware and firmware used for maintaining and updating systems. Last week, Intel issued a security advisory for their server-based products that said AMT could be exploited and give unauthorised parties access to a number of processor features. Analysis at SSH Communications Security says this is a very serious issue and that owners of affected systems should disable AMT. Consumer systems are not affected.