Tagged With holiday spending

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The stretch from November to January is so festive, so cheerful - and so expensive. There are the gifts for your family and friends, new outfits for dinners and parties, booze and food for your own shindigs, airfare or petrol, holiday cards... the list goes on. In my house, at least, the late-January credit bills always bring a horrified reckoning and promises to do better next year.

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The holidays are an expensive time for everyone - holiday travel, gifts, food, booze and festive clothes can break the bank for even the most frugal. But December can be especially financially brutal for single people, says Carey Purcell, writing for the Washington Post. This is in large part because single people are generally shouldering their living expenses alone, rather than splitting them with a partner, which obviously reduces their disposable income at holiday-time. But, as Purcell points out, it's also due to differing expectations for singles than for partnered people.

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Believe it or not, it's time to start saving for the holidays. Gifts, travel, parties -- these expenses creep up on you fast, so you want to prepare as soon as you can (and that means now). To help you save, this month we're challenging you to cut back on a common splurge: Restaurants.