Tagged With headphones

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If there is one thing that can change your mood, it’s music. Hearing is one of your most important senses. Music can be listened to when you’re working out, studying or even commuting, there is never a bad time for it. The power of the music you listen to alone can change the pulse of your heart rate. To really feel or understand the art of music you need to invest in good quality speakers or headphones, listening to it from your phone just won’t quit it.

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Sony's WH-1000XM3s are one of the best noise-cancelling headphones on the market. Boasting excellent noise-blocking tech, wireless connectivity and an ultra-comfy fit, they have been rightly heralded as a superior alternative to Bose's QuietComfort II.

Originally retailing for $549.95, you can currently get them for over $300 off that price over at Amazon Australia. Not bad at all!

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The only thing that makes long-distance driving tolerable is music and/or podcasts. Unfortunately, using the car stereo isn't always an option. Perhaps the speakers are busted, or the person in the passenger seat hates your taste in music.

In these situations, the obvious solution is to don a pair headphones. But is this actually legal?

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On Amazon, a pair of headphones by a manufacturer called HiFiMan costs $US2,250 ($3,327). According to reviews, of which there are 28 supposed buyers, one commenter said his pair broke and that he wouldn’t buy another pair again. (His review mentions that this was his second set from the company.)

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I am not an in-ear headphones user. My ear holes are not sculpted in the shape and size that headphone companies seem to cater for so I tend to avoid them altogether. Give me a chunky over-ear headphone any day.

But when I was offered the chance to take a look at the latest Sony noise-cancelling earbuds, the WF-1000XM3 wireless in-ears, I thought I'd give it a crack. Follow me on my journey to discovering what worked - and what didn't - for me.

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Ever since Apple ditched the iPhone’s headphone jack, getting your old headphones to work with newer smartphones has become a messy issue. Plenty of Android models still have 3.5mm audio jacks, but some, such as Samsung’s upcoming Galaxy Note 10, have followed Apple’s lead and moved to one, single connection option: USB-C.

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We have a fun one in this week’s Ask Lifehacker column. It’s such a weird issue at first glance, that I won’t even tee it up with a lofty introduction. I’ll let Lifehacker reader Natalie explain — and, yes, she called the subject line of her email “YouTube Audio Witchcraft.” That’s how quirky this one is.

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Apple's new AirPods are decent wireless headphones but they will set you back a pretty penny. If you're poking for an alternative that delivers completely wireless sound without costing an arm and leg, there are lots of options. Here are five we've spotted.

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The final nail may have just been struck into the headphone jack's coffin. After years of dogged support, Samsung has quietly ditched 3.5mm audio connectivity from its latest smartphone in favour of USB-C. There's reason to believe that the decision will encompass all future Galaxy models. Here are the details.

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I have to admit that I'm one of those people who is pretty annoyed at the disappearance of the 3.5mm headphone jack from my mobile devices. And while Bluetooth is easy enough to set up, there are times when it's easy to plug in a set of wired headphones. Sony's WH-1000X M3 Wireless Noise Cancelling Headphones offer the best of both worlds. They deliver Bluetooth connectivity but also support a 3.5mm connection. Here's how they performed for me.

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Headphones have become an essential part of our everyday kit. With almost everyone carrying a massive library of music, audiobooks and podcasts in their pockets, a decent set of headphones is a must for blocking out the background hum of the world and immersing yourself in a different world. Catch has a massive headphone sale on at the moment with a style and price for everyone. You can save up to 75%!

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By design, changing the volume on Apple’s AirPods requires either using the volume buttons on your phone, or using Siri to increase or decrease the volume. While your iPhone adjusts the volume in six per cent increments, Siri adjusts the volume in 12–13 per cent increments. Obviously that reduces the number of times you need to request a volume change, but it also removes fine-grained control. How do you get it back?

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On yesterday’s rumour that we won’t be seeing second-gen AirPods until the fourth quarter of 2019, I hurried to the Apple store and bought myself a pair. Unfortunately, I quickly discovered that I am one of those people who is not going to be raving about how the AirPods seem magically cemented to my ears. I will not be able to cycle in a winter wind or do a flip on a snowboard without them falling out.