Tagged With hdtv

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Back in 2010 Sony Australia's Paul Colley forecasted that a large percentage of Australian viewers would have 3D televisions by 2014. In the same year, industry pundits such as Simon Murray predicted that sales of 3D TVs were set to increase in the years to come.

But others were heralding the death of 3D TVs and this year the remaining major manufacturers, LG and Sony, have said they will no longer produce 3D-capable televisions. So despite all the repeated push and positive predictions, what went wrong with 3D TV?

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Buying a HD TV specifically for sports is a bit of a hurdle. How big a screen do you need? Are response times more important than contrast ratio? Should the types of sports you like factor into the decision? And do you need to worry about newfangled 4K and HDR?

In the following guide, we will attempt to answer these questions and more - just in time for Super Bowl Sunday!

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Live streaming in high-definition (HD) has been frustratingly hard to come by in Australia. Now Foxtel Play is finally offering live and on-demand HD streaming through the Telstra TV digital media player. Here's what you need to know.

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If you're looking to upgrade your TV, today is the day to act: JB Hi-Fi is slashing 20 per cent or more off its TV range, including 4K panels from Sony, Panasonic, Samsung and LG. Here are the best deals from JB Hi-Fi's massive TV sale with links to buy online. Prices start at under $200.

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I can’t remember exactly the first thing I did when I bought my HDTV way back in 2007, but if it wasn’t video games, it was almost certainly Planet Earth.

Planet Earth. It was spectacular. It’s one of those ‘things’ – practically impossible to criticise. Incredibly shot, beautifully made, wonderfully narrated. Hyperbole was invented for shows like Planet Earth. For the longest time it was the coolest thing you could watch on a HD television. Now we're getting a 4K sequel — and it might just be the "killer app" 4K TV sorely needs.

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When you drop hundreds on an HDTV, you expect it to work out of the box. Yet somehow, in 2016, we still have to tweak colour settings, adjust brightness and make other changes to get the best picture. How is it possible that with all the technical leaps televisions have made over the years, TVs still require calibration?