Tagged With hackintosh

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A Hackintosh is a machine dedicated to running the Mac operating system but it is strictly non-Apple hardware. Apple is notoriously restrictive with the official hardware that can run its operating systems so, of course, tenacious techies have found ways to work around it. There are whole communities of devotees that dedicate themselves to creating Hackintosh machines with different specifications. Recently, app developer Mike Rundle detailed his process of building a US$1200 Hackintosh. Sounds quite cheap. So how much would it cost an Australian that wants to buy all the parts locally? We did a breakdown of the costs bit by bit.

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Building a hackintosh -- that is, installing Mac OS X on non-Apple hardware -- used to require extremely restricted hardware choices and quite a bit of know-how. Now your options are vast and the installation process is fairly simple. With that in mind, this is our complete guide to building a hackintosh that will walk you through purchasing compatible parts, building your machine and installing OS X all on your own.

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Building a hackintosh -- that is, installing Mac OS X on non-Apple hardware -- used to require extremely restricted hardware choices and quite a bit of know-how. Now your options are vast and the installation process is fairly simple. With that in mind, this is our complete guide to building a hackintosh that will walk you through purchasing compatible parts, building your machine and installing OS X all on your own.

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A new Mac makes a great gift, but if you want to save a little cash this Christmasand give a lucky person an even faster computer than you could buy from Apple, you need to construct a hackintosh. In this gift guide we're offering up several builds to fit any need.

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You didn't want to settle for Apple's underpowered hardware, so you built yourself a hackintosh. A few years later it's feeling slow and you want to upgrade. Because you created the machine yourself, you don't need to shell out tons of cash for a new one. You can upgrade for a fraction of the price of your original build. But upgrading your hackintosh involves a bit of work and some new challenges -- unless you take the right approach.

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Building a hackintosh -- that is, installing Mac OS X on non-Apple hardware -- used to require extremely restricted hardware choices and quite a bit of know-how. Now your options are vast and the installation process is fairly simple. With that in mind, here is our complete guide to building a hackintosh that will walk you through purchasing compatible parts, building your machine and installing OS X all on your own.

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From talking about my hackintosh's so lovingly, there's one question I frequently receive from PowerMac G5 or Mac Pro owners: can I modify my existing case to use hackintosh hardware? Although I've long assumed that it wasn't worth the effort, it looks like I was wrong. If you're willing to make a few modifications to your Apple case, a true Hack Pro is well within your grasp.

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With great hardware comes great opportunity. Thanks to the internet and clever hacking communities, there are plenty of ways to boost the capabilities of your everyday gadgets. Some save you money, some add features, and some are the entire package. Here are our top nine favourite hardware boosting hacks.

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Last week, Apple updated its Mac Pros with old processors from 2010, even older graphics cards and all the USB 2.0 ports you'll ever need. With a proper update unlikely until 2013, we thought we'd bridge the gap with "hackintoshes" -- the faster, cheaper Mac desktops you can build yourself with standard PC hardware. By making your own "Hack Pro" you'll get the up-to-date machine Apple won't provide, and you'll also save a lot of money in the process.

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Chimera, the bootloader we all rely on to make our standard PC hardware boot Mac OS X, received an update allowing it to support OS X Mountain Lion. This is great news if you've been looking to try out the new features of Apple's latest operating system, but you may not want to forge ahead just yet.

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Building a hackintosh -- that is, installing Mac OS X on non-Apple hardware -- used to require extremely restricted hardware choices and quite a bit of know-how. Now your options are vast and the installation process is fairly simple. With that in mind, here is our complete guide to building a hackintosh that will walk you through purchasing compatible parts, building your machine and installing OS X all on your own.

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Windows and Mac OS X don't always get along so well when they're required to co-exist on the same drive, but that doesn't mean they can't. Hackintosh master tonymacx86 outlines the best practices for setting up a dual-boot environment on your hackintosh in this charming video. You'll get all the information in the video above, but here's an outline of the steps you should take for reference.