Tagged With hackers

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Most internet users wouldn't want to share their browsing history with the rest of the world. (It's one of the reasons incognito mode is so popular.) This is especially true of people who look at questionable online material. So what would you be willing to pay if someone had a secret recording of you watching porn, taken on your webcam?

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Shared from Gizmodo

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This week, news of massive security vulnerabilities afflicting every modern model of Intel processor went public, even as developers for practically every major platform frantically rushed to roll out fixes. Much more information has now become available about Meltdown and Spectre, a group of attack methods malicious parties could use to break into some of the most sensitive inner workings of any device using the affected CPUs.

Shared from Gizmodo

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There's small screwups and big screwups. Here is tremendously huge screwup: Virtually all Intel processors produced in the last decade have a major security hole that could allow "normal user programs - from database applications to JavaScript in web browsers - to discern to some extent the layout or contents of protected kernel memory areas," the Register reports.

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Most security reports are pretty dull. They tell the same story. The bad guys can get into almost any system, spend weeks or months there, exfitrate data and generally run amok. They use social engineering attacks or exploit vulnerabilities to find their way into networks. But the Carbon Black report, released today focusses on something else - the malware marketplace.

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Famed white hat hacker Marcus Hutchins -- better known as "MalwareTech" -- was arrested by the FBI yesterday while trying to fly home to the United Kingdom from Las Vegas. The 22-year-old security researcher gained mainstream fame earlier this year as the guy who stopped the destructive WannaCry ransomware from spreading, and had been partying with friends near the Black Hat and Defcon hacker conferences before his arrest. Now, he faces serious federal charges for allegedly creating the Kronos banking trojan. But he's supposed to be the good guy!

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We all the know the MO of threat actors who distribute malware. Deliver a nasty payload, wait for the victim to click and lock up their files, demand payment and wait for the bitcoin to flow. But some bad guys are turning to snitching in lieu of payment.

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Scamwatch is warning Australian gamblers not to part with money they didn't plan to during Spring Racing Season, today issuing an alert that confidence tricksters are on the hunt for more victims. Australians have lost over one million dollars to con artists pushing sports investment scams in 2016 to date.

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This morning a ton of websites and services, including Spotify and Twitter, were unreachable because of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on Dyn, a major DNS provider. Details of how any the attack happened remain vague, but one thing seems certain. Our internet is frightfully fragile in the face of increasingly sophisticated hacks.

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Last month, Microsoft launched a bug bounty program for the Edge web browser that focused on finding remote code execution vulnerabilities. The company has now expanded this program, offering hackers and researchers monetary rewards for different types of security flaws that they find. Here's what you need to know.

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The persistent rumour of a massive Dropbox hack has finally been confirmed -- and the details aren't good. Independent analysis has revealed that over 68 million Dropbox user names and passwords are freely available on the internet. If you didn't do it already, you really need to reset your password.

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If you’ve ever forgotten your phone or left it at home for the day, you will have realised just how much you use it. On average, we check our mobile phones about 110 times a day. Using them for just about everything, from summoning an Uber car and paying for our latest Amazon purchases, to receiving prescriptions and even tracking shares and trading on the stock market.

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If there's one thing the 2016 eCensus outage has highlighted, it's that no organisation can take any chances with the privacy, confidentiality and security of the personal information it collects. Unfortunately, it would seem that hundreds of Australian businesses aren't any better than the ABS. A large-scale survey by IT security firm Shred-it revealed accidental data loss by an employee to be of greater concern than deliberate theft or sabotage. Despite this, training and policies relating to employees mishandling confidential information remains almost non-existent in many organisations. This infographic lays out the damaging facts and figures.

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Remember MySpace? It was the place people went to carve out garish online identities before Facebook made everything clean and homogeneous. If you used to have an account, there's a pretty good chance that your login details have been hacked: LeakedSource is boasting it has the passwords for over 360 million MySpace accounts. (That's a lot of shrines to bad '90s bands and angsty teen poetry.)