Tagged With explainer

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At the tail end of 2017, I had the good fortune to babysit some adorable children for a few hours, during which they proceeded to ask all sorts of (mostly PJ Masks-related) questions. One actual question was: "How does the TV make sound?" As I explained how sound and air interacted, what I really wanted was something tangible I could use to show them exactly how it works - specifically, I wanted this guide on waveforms.

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The English language is constantly evolving, with new words and phrases spreading among us like an infection - we hear things, then we say those things. The problem is that we don't always bother to wonder if we should. Because of that, the original meaning of some demeaning and hateful expressions get lost in time. Here are some widely used examples.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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The 2018 Winter Olympics have begun and it's time to cheer on our athletes. The trouble is, it's hard to know what the heck's going on in some of these events. Why are there so many people skating at once? What is curling exactly? Is ice dancing the same as figure skating? And, woah, does that lady have a gun?

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Ever wondered how horses go from being wild, free-spirited animals to people's most faithful travel companion? Grab your lasso, put on your cowboy hat, and get ready to become a horse whisperer. I mean, you'll probably never need to tame your own horse, but if you did, this is how the masters do it.

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Yesterday the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists pushed the Doomsday Clock forward to two minutes from midnight. The last time the Bulletin got this grim was in 1953, after the US and USSR tested their first hydrogen bombs.

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The problem with most blockchain "explainers" is that they provide more detail than what matters to most people, using language that is foreign to most people, which winds up leaving people more confused than when they started. Instead, without worrying about being a technically perfect description, here's an explanation of blockchain your parents could understand.

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If you're just getting into wine, you probably hear about processes you're not familiar with, like decanting and aeration. But do you need to bother with that stuff? Fear not, future wine snob this is all you need to know.

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I can't help but shake a leg every day and I don't mean dancing. When I sit down or lie down, I feel an uncontrollable urge to move my legs. They bounce for hours on end and most of the time I don't even notice it. When I do, I sometimes try to stop in case it's annoying others around me, but that just makes me feel uncomfortable. I decided to find what's causing all this bothersome bouncing.

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You're probably aware that developed nations such as Israel, Russia and the United States have missile defence systems. But do you know how these systems work? Or how effective they are? They're not the impenetrable shield you think they are.

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During a hearing on October 12, experts warned the US House of Representatives that an EMP bomb, likely from North Korea, could kill as many as 90 per cent of all Americans within a year. But what is an EMP bomb? And could such a weapon really be that devastating?

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There's no greater boogeyman in our modern society than the serial killer. They're ruthless killers, they're everywhere, and they're after you -- right? Not really. Serial killers are very real, and very dangerous, but the chances of you encountering one are next to nothing.

Shared from Kotaku

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The Matrix movie title credits show falling green digital code. If you know Japanese, the katakana characters will look familiar, but where did this code actually come from? The man who created the title sequence recently revealed the source: His wife's Japanese cook book. 

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You're in a long, boring meeting. You look up at the clock again, hoping time is passing by faster than it feels, but instead the clock's seconds hand doesn't seem to move at all. No, the clock didn't just pause to mock you, your brain is playing tricks on you.