Tagged With energy drinks

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Sugar-laden soft drinks are one of the biggest causes of obesity in the western world. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australians drink a whopping 100 litres of soft drink per head each year and we're getting fatter as a result. If you've grown a (ginger) beer belly in recent years, it's probably time to cut soft drinks from your diet for good. This infographic provides 12 proven weaning tactics to help you quit.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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Red Bull may give you wings, but at what cost? To some, energy drinks are dangerous elixirs, while others consider them magic potions of vitality. The truth about how they affect your body is not so black and white.

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Soft drinks are regularly cited as one of the top causes of obesity and tooth decay in Australia: yet we still quaff them by the gallon. You know it's bad for you -- you may have even tried to quit -- but that highly addictive sugar hit will always have you in its thrall. This infographic breaks down the sugar content in five popular drinks; from Coke to Powerade. The ranking might actually surprise you. (Who would have thought a certain iced tea would be worse than Red Bull?)

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Dear Lifehacker, I recently cut sugar from my diet and swapped to stevia-based sweeteners in a bid to lose weight. So far it's working (2kg in one week!) However, one thing that isn't clear to me is how stevia affects tooth decay. Is it safe to swish this stuff around in my mouth, or should I still be using a straw?