Tagged With eating healthy

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Dear Lifehacker, I've decided I want to get healthier and shed some excess weight. I'm pretty time-poor, so I'll be mainly relying on diet microwave dinners from the supermarket (Weight Watchers, Lean Cuisine, McCain Healthy Choice, etc.) My question is: will these products actually help me lose weight? And are they considered healthy?

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Most parents will tell you their kids love juice. It tastes good, often comes in convenient and child-friendly packaging, and seems much healthier than soft drinks, sports drinks or other sweet beverages. It comes from fruit, after all. But we also know it’s high in sugar, and so can contribute to obesity and dental problems.

We asked five experts in nutrition, dietetics, medicine and dentistry whether or not we should let our kids drink juice.

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Many of us have lost weight to feel better about our bodies before donning a bathing suit for a beach holiday, or getting into that just-too-tight outfit for a special occasion. But old habits die hard, and before we know it we’ve started eating that chocolate cake and stopped going to the gym. Soon after losing the weight, we find ourselves back where we started – or worse. This is called yo-yoing.

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It seems barely a day goes by without some new "miracle" diet littering our social media feed. Some are very well known (hello, paleo) while others are slowly gaining traction (the 'blood type' diet.) One thing that most of them share in common is a lack of rigorous scientific research. This infographic pits seven popular diets against the expertise of a professional nutritionist.

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We all have that one friend whose eating habits and body shape simply don’t add up. While enjoying the unhealthiest of meals and a sedentary lifestyle, somehow they effortlessly retain a slender figure.

At first glance we may assume these slim people are healthy, but it’s not always the case. Being healthy has nothing to do with your BMI and everything to do with what you put in your mouth.

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Wholemeal, wholegrain, multigrain, sourdough, rye, white, high fibre white, low GI, low FODMAP, gluten free. With so many choices of bread available, how are we to know which is best for our health? Let's take a look at the science.

Shared from Gizmodo

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It's that time of year again - when we are inundated with information about what the next great wellness blogger will be instagramming non-stop as a cure-all for, well, all.

So what do the experts make of this year's biggest trends - hemp, proats, flexatarianism, adaptogens, kanuka and seaweed? I spoke to nutritionist Catherine Saxelby from Foodwatch to find out.

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A thrusting young buck at work recently approached me to ask for some tips on toning up. He does a lot of exercise but lives pretty generously. That means, whatever his body asks him for, he generously provides. As a result he has cultivated something of a "Dadbod" and has now decided to take action to stem the tide.

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A study released this month in The Lancet found a link between high carbohydrate intake and risk of death. The resulting headlines had dedicated low-carb dieters celebrating and low-fat vegans spoiling for a fight. But as with most dietary studies, there is more to it than the headlines claim.

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Only 20 years ago butter was the public villain – contributing to raised cholesterol levels and public concern over an increased risk of heart disease. Now this public perception seems to have been reversed, and reality cooking shows seem to use butter in every recipe. But what has caused this shift in perceptions and is it based on scientific evidence?

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Today every kitchen would seem “under-equipped” without a microwave, with its efficient ability to cook, defrost and reheat a variety of different foods. The handy appliance uses microwave radiation to do so. This is a type of electromagnetic radiation similar to radio waves and infrared light.

Although generally recognised as safe, the internet is awash with articles about the dangers microwave radiation poses to your food. Some claim using microwaves can cause “cataracts and cancer”. Other posts says it “zaps the nutrients right out of your food”.

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These days, it seems like everything can cause cancer. Peanut butter, bacon, alcohol, weed killer, air pollution, baby food, vitamins, birth control pills, pet cats, bottled water, toothpaste, vegetables - the list goes on and on.

Obviously, not all of these things are guaranteed to cause cancer, but there are definitely some foods, liquids and objects that you should try to avoid or cut down on. Naturally, your lifestyle and level of exercise also plays a huge part. This interactive "body map" brings together the evidence on proven cancer causes - from salty foods to sun exposure.

Shared from Gizmodo

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People with high carb diets are more likely to have poor health than people with high fat diets, according to an international study of over 135,000 people from 18 countries. Diet is a contentious topic, so we've gathered together the opinions of various experts in the field to discuss the findings of this study.

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Human adults are supposed to eat at least two serves of fruit and five serves of vegetables per day to keep healthy. But what constitutes a "serve"?

This can be difficult to calculate, especially when it comes to small fruits and diced vegetables. This infographic explains how to work out your portions.

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Nutritionists have long argued that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. According to multiple studies, regularly eating a healthy breakfast can lower the risk of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases. What else can happen if you keep skipping breakfast? Here are four ways it could affect your health.

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A recent article published in the Medical Journal of Australia found that Australian and European soft drinks contained higher concentrations of glucose, and less fructose, than soft drinks in the United States. The total glucose concentration of Australian soft drinks was on average 22% higher than in US formulations.

We know too much sugar is bad for us, but do different sugars have different health effects? Let's take a look at the science.

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Like most guys of a certain vintage, I have mixed feelings about my body. Staying lean and not surrendering to the siren’s call of the dreaded 'Dadbod' is a key concern. But then so is building and maintaining enough muscle so that I can keep up with the young bucks on the soccer field or in the gym.

One of the main keys to success is your diet. You need a meal plan that's high in healthy carbs, fats and proteins. More importantly, it needs to be easy to prepare and affordable - so you'll actually stick to it.

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There are many brands of kids' “vitamin gummies” on the market. They are promoted as deliciously flavoured and a great way for growing bodies (and fussy eaters) to get the nutrients they need. In our opinion, these products are unhealthy, poorly regulated and exploitative. Their high sugar content may appeal to young children, but they’re not a good introduction to a healthy diet.