Tagged With coding

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As the adage goes, it's never too late to start over. If you feel like a career change and like the idea of building websites for a living, this infographic from finance site Varooma contains everything a beginner needs to know - with an emphasis on finding paid work.

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When I was a kid, I couldn’t have imagined learning to code, build a website or create an app or a game. (OK, I still can’t imagine doing those things, but I can’t even properly work my son’s Kindle Fire, so I’m a bit of a mess when it comes to technology.) Our digital native children, however, eat this stuff up.

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If you want to teach your kid how to code, there’s certainly no shortage of apps, iPad-connected toys, motorised kits and programmable pets that you can buy for your future Google employee. Some are great, no doubt, but many focus on isolated skills, which may or may not be relevant in the decades ahead. For young children, what might be more critical than learning to code is learning how to think like a coder. And for that, they don’t even need a computer.

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There are so many ways to learn web development, your problem might be how to choose a starting point. The design site CSS-Tricks has their own guide for learning HTML and CSS — but they’ve compiled plenty of alternatives into a wide-ranging but approachable list.

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If you want to learn how to code, there are a ton of resources out there to help you learn how. Websites like Codecademy, Udacity, and Khan Academy can help you kick the tires a little bit and see if coding is for you. This week, a group from Google launched another option, a mobile app called Grasshopper that can help you learn Javascript during your morning commute.

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Coding school App Academy has opened a free online interactive version of its 12-week curriculum. That’s a pretty good deal, since the Academy’s in-person classes in San Francisco and New York can cost as much as a semester in university. The online version involves less direct human interaction, but it includes online mentors and access to a community Slack chat.

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There are as many ways to learn to code as there are ways to use your coding ability. You can learn it from college courses, books, online resources — or from one of several growing boot camps for developers of all ages. We talked to the founders of two such boot camps: David Graham of Code Ninjas, for kids 7–14 and Michael Choi of Coding Dojo, for teens and adults. They explained their different approaches, both of which give their students the ability to build their own applications.

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Dear Lifehacker, I'm a teenager in year 10 and I've started looking at things like programming and coding. I was wondering if you could tell me how to get started with programs like C and Python? I've struggled to find helpful tutorials online for teenagers.

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If you're learning CSS, or you want a friendly introduction to some of its terms and concepts, try 30 Seconds of CSS. Each entry on this site shows a different bit of code, demonstrates the result, and explains how each part of the code works.

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If you're new to building web apps, check out the first issue of You Got This! a friendly zine from developer community Glitch. The issue teaches the basic concepts behind web servers, and the npm package manager for Javascript. It also features career profiles of three community-leading web developers, and blurbs of advice from a dozen more developers from places such as Google, Mozilla and Slack.

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Machine learning (AKA AI) seems bizarre and complicated. It's the tech behind image and speech recognition, recommendation systems, and all kinds of tasks that computers used to be really bad at but are now really good at. It involves teaching a computer to teach itself. And you can learn to do it in well under a year, according to data scientist Bargava. You'll need to put in a solid 10-20 hours a week, but you will learn a lot along the way.

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As a product manager at IBM, Anamita Guha works on bots, AR/VR technology and AI - including Watson, the most famous AI that doesn't come packaged on a phone. She also leads analytics for TEDxSanFrancisco and serve as a technical consultant to a clinical research lab at UCSF. We talked to her about her work habits, as general as deepening relationships and as specific as colour-coding notebooks.