Tagged With cameras

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When he was 15 years old, Ryan Pierse stole his Dad’s camera. That simple act of thievery started a life-long passion for photography which, eventually, led him to shooting five Olympic Games.

For the next two weeks, he will battle extreme cold, dying batteries and exhaustion to try and capture the perfect moment at the PyeongChang Winter Olympics, all while carrying a mountain of gear on his back.

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When it comes to ergonomics, we put a lot of focus on posture, specifically sitting at a desk. But posture is important regardless of what you're doing, including carrying a camera bag around. So, if you're a keen photographer and wondering why you're getting headaches and shoulder pain, it might be time to reconsider your choice of backpack.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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When it comes to purchasing a lens for your digital camera, the sheer number of options, specifications, acronyms and features is enough to make anyone throw up their hands in frustration and resort to simply using their smartphone. But dedicated cameras are still worth it, and produce high-quality photos that smartphone cameras just can't match with their minuscule sensors.

Once you know what you're looking for, and know how different companies brand identical features, it isn't too difficult to figure out what type of lens you need. With a little education, you can determine which features in your new lens are superfluous, essential, or just nice to have.

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Smartphone cameras keep getting better and better but if you really want to kick your photography up a few levels, they can only take you so far. If you're a little green when it comes to photography, it can be hard to know where to start looking so you don't want to splurge on your first big camera purchase and slap down a few grand for something you might not even use (or know how to use!).

Whether you’re after a mirrorless camera, DSLRs, action cameras or even a point-and-shoot, we’ve got you covered with our round up of some of the best cameras you can buy for under $1000.

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Last month I went to Outside Lands, a three-day music festival in San Francisco where musical artists from pretty much every genre out there performed on a bunch of different stages around Golden Gate Park. Regardless of what type of music was being played, each stage had one thing in common: Someone (or a lot of people) were standing close to the stage with their phones hoisted to take pictures and shoot video, obstructing the view of everyone behind them. As a shorter person, I experienced the vast majority of the shows during the weekend by watching them through someone's phone screen. Besides being obnoxious, turns out there also isn't much of a point to filming everything.

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Dear Lifehacker, I'm interested in getting a camera that has a remote control to take self-portraits. What do you recommend? I don’t mind something easy to use, it doesn’t need to be super high-tech, and I don’t like bulky cameras. Also is there some sort of mini tripod that goes with the camera? One I can put on a desk. Or do I need a regular tripod? I'm on a budget, I can spend maybe up to $2k all up? Eek, is that impossible?

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There are many ways to take a good photograph: positioning and lighting, compelling subject matter and decent equipment can all play a role. However, it's also possible to boost the quality of your photos via a few simple tricks. With that in mind, here are 21 camera hacks from the Lifehacker archives - from candid photography tips to cheap DIY accessories.

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iOS: Apple's default camera app is a multifaceted photo capture tool, and simple enough to use. From panoramas to videos to HDR pictures, you can capture a variety of images, but can't reach that granularity you might want if you're trying to frame that perfect shot. Photographers looking for more control should check out Halide ($7.99), a great app for dedicated photographers who want controls at their fingertips, or amateurs who want to play with the principles of the medium.

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The sensor of a digital camera is one of the most delicate parts of the device. While lenses can be replaced, a damaged sensor poses a significantly trickier repair job. But, from time to time, you're going to need to get in their to clean the thing and when it comes to the mirrorless variety, you don't have to get yourself into a tight ball of anxiety in preparation.