Tagged With browser

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Firefox is adding a new feature that will tell you if you’re visiting a website that has been hacked. Working with Aussie security researcher Troy Hunt, the Mozilla team will use the Have I Been Pawnd service to identify sites that have been compormised to warn you.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

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It turns out your browser's privacy features aren't as anonymous as you think. Although Ingonito mode on Chrome, InPrivate with Edge and Private browsing with Safari make it harder for someone to view your browser history on your device, they don't hide your browser habits completely.

Whenever your computer visits a website, that traffic can be recorded and linked back to you directly. So, what can you do to be totally private on the web?

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While Chrome is most people's favourite browser and Edge is the browser most used to download other browsers, Mozilla's Firefox has just been updated to version 54. The focus of this release was knocking over 32 bugs that were potentially exploitable by attackers.

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While Chrome has won the crown as the most popular desktop browser, it's not the only game in town. Opera continues to add new features. Last year, it was the addition of an integrated VPN that won it headlines. This week, Opera released a new version. Codenamed Reborn, it allows messenger apps to reside within the browser without the need to install any extensions or apps.

Shared from Gizmodo

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The second you log onto the internet, you start leaving a trace that's more telling than you think. Browsers can not only identify where you are in the world, but they collect a ton of other data too, such as where your mouse is hovering and when you launch a private browser window. Here's a way to find out exactly what you're leaking.

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Extensions have been sorely lacking in Microsoft's internet browsers but within the last few days the company has doubled efforts in this area. It has added support for a handful of extensions for the Edge browser in the latest Windows 10 preview build and is working on a tool to let developers port Chrome extensions over. Here's what you need to know.

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Looking up a recipe via regular search results in hundreds if not thousands of pages to dig through. Perhaps an easier way to find a recipe is to search for the food you want to make then click on the photo that appeals to you most -- something that Bing now lets you do.

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One of the arguments in favour of vendor-controlled app stores (such as those run by Apple for the Mac or Microsoft for Windows 8) is that they make systems more secure by ensuring all apps are vetted. But those stores also create a fresh security issue: because they control the process of updating apps, you won't always get security fixes as quickly, and it becomes much harder to control deployment across business environments.

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Windows only: Free application Lunascape is a web browser capable of running any of the three major web rendering engines—Gecko (Firefox), WebKit (Safari/Chrome), and Trident (Internet Explorer). That means that each time you open a new tab or follow a link, you can tell Lunascape which engine you want to use to render the page. The idea, in theory, is that Lunascape gives you the benefits of each popular browser in one. For example, Lunascape gives you IE support for the few IE-only sites still out there and no-nonsense speed from WebKit or Gecko.

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New peer-to-peer file sharing web service LittleShoot finds and downloads files right inside your web browser. LittleShoot founder (and former LimeWire engineer) Adam Fisk says he created LittleShoot to overcome LimeWire's shortcomings. To get started, you can search for a keyword at the LittleShoot web site without installing a thing and you'll get dozens of results from YouTube, Flickr, Yahoo, and LittleShoot users. (See the results for a search on "Twilight" above.) To play or download a file, you will have to download and install a small LittleShoot add-on. To publish a file on LittleShoot, hit the Publish tab and add a file on your local computer. The Mashable web site reports that LittleShoot is optimised to find nearby computers that host the file you need as well as defaulting to computers on the same ISP to increase download speeds and responsiveness. All in all, LittleShoot is looking very promising for P2P-ers who don't want to run full-fledged BitTorrent or other clients. What's your favourite way to P2P? Let us know in the comments. Thanks, Sangraal!

LittleShoot