Tagged With browser

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The standard or “stable” version of Google Chrome offers plenty of handy customisations and quality-of-life improvements, but if you want to get the latest experimental features before anyone else, you’ll want to check out Chrome Canary.

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Say a webpage isn’t loading right. Maybe it’s collapsed from too much traffic after going viral on Reddit. Maybe it’s blocked in your country thanks to a law like GDPR. Maybe it was recently deleted. Usually Google has a saved copy of that page. And the quickest way to get that saved copy is to type cache: in the address bar.

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Chrome fans might have noticed a little change in their browsers today. Assuming you’re running Chrome’s latest iteration, version 68, you’ll now see a big “not secure” button in the address bar whenever you pull up a website that starts with http:// instead of https://. (For what it’s worth, I’m using Chrome version 67.0.3396.99, and it pops up there, too, whenever a page has a data entry field.)

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Windows, Mac: You probably have a few websites that you use all the time — perhaps a special CMS you need for work, a time-tracking site you use to track and bill hours for clients, or a web game you just can’t get enough of. If you’re tired of pulling up your browser each time you need to access it, you have an alternative: Transform it into an app.

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We all fall victim to the dangerous belief that if an app or extension is listed in an official repository - be it the App Store, Google Play, the Microsoft Store, Mozilla's Add-Ons directory or so on - it must be legitimate. After all, the big tech companies surely use a lot of automated systems (and real human beings) to ensure that their customers aren't downloading harmful things. Right?

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Browser cookies are useful in some instances; unpleasant in others. While they can save you from having to go through a complicated authentication process whenever you're trying to access your favourite sites, they can also store data on what you've done on a particular website -- which can then be used to serve you more "relevant" advertising at a future point.

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So you just installed Google Chrome -- that, or you've cleared your cache and history because you wanted to save some space on your PC or fix some website issue involving cookies. You go to pull up your favourite website and, suddenly, a sound starts blasting out of your speakers. The dreaded autoplaying video returneth.

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Even if you're the next Stephen King or George R. R. Martin -- and if you're the latter, please try to write faster -- everyone needs a helping hand with writing. That's why the world has editors, and copy editors, grammar coaches, ten million books on writing, and most importantly, browser extensions that can help you better your craft.

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Firefox is adding a new feature that will tell you if you’re visiting a website that has been hacked. Working with Aussie security researcher Troy Hunt, the Mozilla team will use the Have I Been Pawnd service to identify sites that have been compormised to warn you.

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It turns out your browser's privacy features aren't as anonymous as you think. Although Ingonito mode on Chrome, InPrivate with Edge and Private browsing with Safari make it harder for someone to view your browser history on your device, they don't hide your browser habits completely.

Whenever your computer visits a website, that traffic can be recorded and linked back to you directly. So, what can you do to be totally private on the web?

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While Chrome is most people's favourite browser and Edge is the browser most used to download other browsers, Mozilla's Firefox has just been updated to version 54. The focus of this release was knocking over 32 bugs that were potentially exploitable by attackers.