Tagged With amazon

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A recent survey shows that Australians are feeling more time-poor than ever, with 45 per cent of women and 36 per cent of men feeling “always” or “often” rushed, or “pressed for time”. Meanwhile, research has identified that almost one in four shoppers (23%) are willing to pay a premium for “same day” delivery.

In other words, consumers’ expectations are changing. Speed is becoming a point of difference, a new front of competition, between retailers. And many Australian retailers are lagging behind.

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Traditional business models, exemplified by Amazon and other large online retailers and marketplaces, are changing the way customers shop and their expectations of customer interactions. AI and the advent of powerful mobile computing devices are among the big drivers of this change. Ian Wong, a partner in IBM's digital strategy business discussed this revolution with me.

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While many retailers see Amazon's price and range as a significant threat to their business, for shoppers, the rubber really hits the road when it comes to shipping. A big part of Amazon's advantage in overseas markets comes from their ability to get products into buyers' hands quickly and efficiently. And high shipping costs are one of the big reasons Aussies don't complete online transactions.

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Looking at the reactions of many large retailers, it's clear Australian businesses are completely spooked by the thought of Amazon setting up shop on our shores. Most are falling back to the old tactics of lowering prices and boosting their product range - Myer's relaunch of the Bargain Basement and KMart's discounting strategies show this. And we can always rely on Gerry Harvey to launch his usual "Get off my lawn" rant. But is there another way? Graham Jackson from Fluent Retail says there is.

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If you were in any doubt about the level of business acumen possessed by the leaders of many of Australia's largest retailers then the last week or so will have confirmed your expectations. Despite what many retailers think, Amazon's big advantage is not price - it's service. But events of the last week seem to have confirmed that Australian retailers are clueless when it comes to reacting to a changing market.

Shared from Gizmodo

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Amazon is setting up shop in Australia, and according to a recent survey, a massive 90 per cent of us online shopping-types will use the service - if it comes good with the low prices, vast selection and fast delivery we've been promised, of course.

And why wouldn't we?

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DynamoDB is Amazon’s database platform for those applications where you need a database but aren’t interested in setting up a server and all the other rigmarole that goes with it. DynamoDB uses a provisioned capacity model. You set the amount of read and write capacity required by your applications and change provisioning for your table with an API call or button click in the AWS Management Console. Now, DynamoDB has new settings that will auto scale as your needs change.

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A few weeks ago, I bought a new television. When the whole process was over, I realised something incredible: To navigate all of the niggling details surrounding this one commercial transaction - figuring out what to buy, which accessories I needed, how and where to install it, and whom to hire to do so - I had dealt with only a single ubiquitous corporation.

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Catch of the Day has grown from a daily deals site into one of the largest online retailers in the country. They are already shipping over 10,000 products each day and their Club Catch program, which offers free shipping of orders worth more than $50, has about 75,000 members and is adding another 2,000 each week. But CEO Gabby Leibovich, is planning to further expand the business as they prepare for Amazon’s Australian entry in 2018.

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Amazon’s entry into the Australian retail next year is already hitting retailers hard. But it’s not just bricks and mortar stores that will be hurt. All those goods Amazon will be shipping, either from their own warehouses or from resellers who take advantage of Amazon’s market place will need to get to customers like you and me. That means warehouses, planes and trucks will be needed - and it will put entire supply chains and logistics providers under new pressure.

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Amazon is coming. We've heard all about how it's going to be an Australian retail killer. But if you're a competitor on a much, much smaller scale, what can you do to protect yourself against wholesale abandonment of local business?

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It's official -- Amazon is setting up shop properly in Australia, and is promising "low prices, vast selection, and fast delivery" to win the business of paying Australians.